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WAMU 88.5

Merethe Lindstrom: "Days In The History Of Silence"

The latest novel from a celebrated Norwegian writer, "Days in the History of Silence" is a haunting meditation on the legacy of family secrets.

WAMU 88.5

How To Write Short

In a time-starved culture with a case of information overload, the skill of using fewer words may be the most effective writing technique of all.

NPR

Haitian Youth Illuminated In 'Sea Light'

Claire of the Sea Light is award-winning author Edwidge Danticat's newest work of fiction. She spoke to host Rachel Martin about how experiences of her own childhood in Haiti are reflected in her young protagonist.
NPR

'The Blessing Cup': Polacco And Her Family Of Storytellers

Patricia Polacco has written and illustrated more than 90 picture books, and she says her early life had a profound effect on her work. In her latest children's book, The Blessing Cup, Polacco takes readers back to her grandparents' time in Russia.
NPR

Carving Up Hippos In 'The Sound Of Things Falling'

A new book by Juan Gabriel Vasquez is set in 1960s Bogota, when Colombians lived with drug-related violence daily. Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon talks with Vasquez about his book.
NPR

'Bummers, Blisters And Boondoggles': A Jokester Joins The Army

Humorist and late-night radio voice Jean Shepherd spent time in the U.S. Army during World War II. He never made it overseas, but the stories he mined from that experience have now been collected in a new volume, Shep's Army.
NPR

Sisterly Conflict Against A Great War Backdrop In 'Daughters Of Mars'

Thomas Keneally's new novel, The Daughters of Mars, follows two Australian sisters who become nurses during World War I. Naomi and Sally Durance share a guilty secret, but they don't share any sisterly closeness — until the horrors of war begin to bind them together.
WAMU 88.5

Judith Flanders: "The Invention Of Murder"

Author Judith Flanders joins guest host Frank Sesno to talk about the evolution of the real -- and fictional -- crime story.

NPR

Wild, Wild Web: Policing An Early, Lawless Internet

There was a time when many thought the Internet was beyond government regulation, its very chaos a source of creativity and strength. Nate Anderson's The Internet Police looks at how law enforcement went about changing that.
NPR

'Southern League': Birmingham Barons Break Racial Divide

By 1964, Birmingham, Ala., gained infamy as the center of the civil rights struggle. In the midst of that tension, one of the city's major institutions broke through the racial divide. The Birmingham Barons minor league baseball club became the first integrated professional sports team in the state. David Greene talks to author Larry Colton, whose book, Southern League, traces how this milestone affected the city.

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