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In Book's Trial Of U.S. Justice System, Wealth Gap Is Exhibit A

Journalist Matt Taibbi investigates the differences between punishment for white-collar and blue-collar crimes in The Divide. He also questions beliefs about who is "appropriate for jail."
NPR

Lydia Davis' New Collection Has Stories Shorter Than This Headline

The award-winning author is known for her brevity, and Can't And Won't doesn't disappoint. Davis tells NPR's Rachel Martin that the works of Russell Edson inspired her to write super-short stories.
NPR

Biographer Explains How John Updike 'Captured America'

Adam Begley says Updike created an everyman in his Rabbit book series, and inhabited him fully, "allowing that everyman's senses to be totally open to the American experience."
NPR

A Century Of History In The Life Of An Ordinary Indian

Ayya's Accounts: A Ledger of Hope in Modern India chronicles the life of an ordinary man in extraordinary times. NPR's Scott Simon talks to author Anand Pandian about his subject, his grandfather.
WAMU 88.5

New Yorker Cartoon Editor Bob Mankoff

The New Yorker's longtime cartoon editor joins us to talk about the serious business of being funny.

NPR

In The 1870s And '80s, Being A Pedestrian Was Anything But

Huge crowds packed arenas to watch the world's best pedestrians walk in circles for six days at a time. And trainers encouraged the athletes to drink champagne — at the time considered a stimulant.
NPR

Embarrassing Stains? This Housekeeping Guide Gets That Life Is Messy

Jerry Seinfeld joked that if you have bloodstains on your clothes, you have bigger problems than the laundry. But Jolie Kerr helps with all the stains in a new book, My Boyfriend Barfed in My Handbag.
NPR

How 'Soul Train' Shaped A Generation

For millions of people in the 1970s, the week was not complete without Soul Train. Writer Nelson George captures the legacy of the show and its creator in his new book The Hippest Trip in America.
NPR

A Song Of Frogs, Motherhood And Murder In Swampy San Francisco

Author Emma Donoghue's new novel, Frog Music, imagines a new solution to the 1876 murder of a San Francisco frog-catcher — and fits in a lot of raw and raunchy popular songs along the way.
NPR

The Rise And Fall Of Stefan Zweig, Who Inspired 'Grand Budapest Hotel'

The Viennese writer was once one of the world's most translated authors, but after his death he was forgotten — until now. Wes Anderson credits Zweig's writing at the end of his latest film.

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