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Two Books For Kids About How Hard It Is To Fit In

In February, the young readers in NPR's Backseat Book Club read a pair of books: The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes and Shooting Kabul by N.H. Senzai. They were published 60 years apart but share similar themes about standing out, getting teased and being strong.
NPR

From Rural Farm To Capitol Hill, Step By Step

Bertie Bowman's Step by Step marks the final chapter of Tell Me More's Black History Month memoir series. Bowman was a farm worker in South Carolina, but a chance encounter with a senator brought him to the job of sweeping the Capitol steps. He now serves on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Bowman talks with host Michel Martin.
NPR

The Man Working To Reverse-Engineer Your Brain

Our brains are filled with billions of neurons. Neuroscientist Sebastian Seung explains how mapping out the connections between those neurons might be the key to understanding the basis of things like personality, memory, perception, ideas and mental illness.
NPR

Putin 101: Understanding Russia's 'Strongman'

Angus Roxburgh, a British journalist who has been covering Russia for over two decades, offers a new look at the enigmatic Russian leader in The Strongman: Vladimir Putin and the Struggle for Russia.
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Akash Kapur: India Becoming

India has been hailed as a model for the developing world. But its economic boom has led to a widening wealth gap, environmental damage and increase in crime. The price of growth in modern India.

NPR

Vladimir Putin's World View Was Shaped By KGB

Russia holds a presidential election this Sunday, and Prime Minister Vladimir Putin is widely expected to win. If he does, he'll return to the office he held from 2000 to 2008. Putin is the subject of the book, The Strongman: Vladimir Putin and the Struggle for Russia. David Greene talks to its author Angus Roxburgh, a journalist who once served as a public relations adviser to the Putin-run Kremlin.

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