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Sisterly Conflict Against A Great War Backdrop In 'Daughters Of Mars'

Thomas Keneally's new novel, The Daughters of Mars, follows two Australian sisters who become nurses during World War I. Naomi and Sally Durance share a guilty secret, but they don't share any sisterly closeness — until the horrors of war begin to bind them together.
WAMU 88.5

Judith Flanders: "The Invention Of Murder"

Author Judith Flanders joins guest host Frank Sesno to talk about the evolution of the real -- and fictional -- crime story.

NPR

Wild, Wild Web: Policing An Early, Lawless Internet

There was a time when many thought the Internet was beyond government regulation, its very chaos a source of creativity and strength. Nate Anderson's The Internet Police looks at how law enforcement went about changing that.
NPR

'Southern League': Birmingham Barons Break Racial Divide

By 1964, Birmingham, Ala., gained infamy as the center of the civil rights struggle. In the midst of that tension, one of the city's major institutions broke through the racial divide. The Birmingham Barons minor league baseball club became the first integrated professional sports team in the state. David Greene talks to author Larry Colton, whose book, Southern League, traces how this milestone affected the city.
NPR

App, Secret Sites Create The Immersive World Of 'Night Film'

Author Marisha Pessl turned to technology to enrich readers' experience of her new thriller, Night Film — creating found-footage YouTube films, screen shots of hidden websites, and an app that readers can use to access additional content after scanning an illustration in the book.
NPR

'Lawrence' Of Arabia: From Archaeologist To War Hero

T.E. Lawrence, the British officer who played a key role in the Middle East during World War I, served as one of that war's few romantic champions. Scott Anderson's Lawrence in Arabia explains how Lawrence used his knowledge of Arab culture and medieval history to advance British causes.
NPR

A Dystopian View Of America's 'Fallen' Suburbs

Patrick Flanery's taut new novel, Fallen Land, delves into the housing crisis, creeping corporate surveillance and a "crisis of neighborliness" in American life. The backdrop: a half-built and crumbling subdivision outside of an unnamed American city.
NPR

What Drove Wild West's Jesse James To Become An Outlaw?

In Shot All To Hell, author Mark Lee Gardner explores the roots of James' life of crime following the Civil War.
NPR

'Good Lord Bird' Gives Abolitionist Heroes Novel Treatment

In 1857, John Brown liberates 12-year-old Henry from his master. There's only one problem: Brown is so wrapped up in his freedom mission, he thinks Henry is a girl. James McBride delivers a portrait of Brown and his friend Frederick Douglass as Henry sees them.
NPR

'18 In America': Coast To Coast With Golf Clubs In Hand

Dylan Dethier took a year off between high school and college for an unusual quest: He wanted to play a round of golf in each of the 48 contiguous states. His new book, 18 in America, chronicles that year, and he joins NPR's Scott Simon on the putt-putt course to talk about it.

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