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NFL Veteran Recounts The Bruises And Breaks Of Life In The League.

Former NFL receiver Nate Jackson's new memoir, Slow Getting Up, is a raw account of his six years on the field. Jackson spent most of that time with the Denver Broncos, and while he wasn't a star, he got just as banged up as the big-name players — and learned to play through the pain.
NPR

Abused By Both Polanski And Media, 'The Girl' Moves On

Samantha Geimer was victimized twice: once by an infamous Hollywood director who fled prosecution after raping her when she was 13, and again by a relentless media, which has hounded her for the past three decades.
NPR

A Road Trip Sparks An Unlikely Friendship In 'Norvelt To Nowhere'

Young Jack hits the road with his cranky, elderly teacher Miss Volker (and a couple of cranky, elderly cars) in From Norvelt to Nowhere, the new young adult novel from Jack Gantos. The sequel to 2011's Newbery-winning Dead End in Norvelt is set in 1962, in the shadow of the Cuban missile crisis.
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Dara Horn: "A Guide For The Perplexed"

A brilliant software developer, Josie, creates a program to record and archive everything we do and say. A 19th-century scholar discovers a treasure trove of ancient documents in a Cairo "genizah," or synagogue's repository for holy items that cannot be discarded. The narratives in Dara Horn's new novel intersect when Josie is kidnapped in Egypt, raising questions about what it means to remember the past.

NPR

Years After Historic Ruling, Execution Still A 'Random' Justice

Evan Mandery's A Wild Justice is an account of the legal battles that led to the U.S. Supreme Court striking down capital punishment, then reversing course four years later. He says that today, prisoners who are sentenced to death have a 10 percent chance of actually being executed.
NPR

Bio Credits Manson's Terrible Rise To Right Place And Time

California parolee Charles Manson arrived in San Francisco in 1967, when the city was full of young waifs looking for a guru. In Manson, Jeff Guinn argues that if the cult leader had instead been paroled in a place like Nebraska, he likely would not have been so successful.
NPR

'Don't Know'? Just Admit It

Author Leah Hager Cohen says it's time to stop faking your way through conversations. "Once you finally own up to what you don't know, then you can begin to have honest interactions with the people around you," she explains.
NPR

How Slavery Shaped America's Oldest And Most Elite Colleges

In Ebony & Ivy, an MIT historian details how the nation's colleges helped justify and benefited from the slave trade.
NPR

In Memoir, Linda Ronstadt Describes Her 'Simple Dreams'

Last month, Ronstadt revealed that she has Parkinson's disease and can no longer sing. Her new memoir, Simple Dreams, reflects on a long career. In this conversation with Fresh Air's Terry Gross, she offers frank insights on sex, drugs, and why "competition was for horse races."
NPR

Kitchen Time Machine: A Culinary Romp Through Soviet History

Author Anya Von Bremzen's new memoir, Mastering The Art of Soviet Cooking, is a tragic-comic history of a family and a nation as seen through the kitchen window. Everything we ate in the Soviet Union was grown ... by the party state," she says. "So, with the food, inevitably, you ingested the ideology."

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