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WAMU 88.5

Sylviane Diouf: "Slavery's Exiles"

They are known as "maroons:" escaped slaves who lived on the margins of settlements throughout the southern U.S. A new book explores how and where they lived, and what day-to-day survival meant for those who fled slavery.

NPR

Dating Sites Offer Chance At Love — And A Lesson In Economics

When economist Paul Oyer returned to the world of dating, he started logging on to match-making websites. As he explains in a new book, he discovered that his academic expertise was entirely relevant to his foray into online dating.
NPR

In The World's 'Sixth Extinction' Are Humans The Asteroid?

The dinosaurs were killed during the Fifth Extinction — which scientists suspect was caused by an asteroid. Now, we are living through an epoch that many scientists describe as the Sixth Extinction and this time, human activity is the culprit.
NPR

The Earth's Sixth Extinction May Be One Of Our Own Making

Over the last half a billion years, there have been five major mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on Earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. But this time around, writer Elizabeth Kolbert says, humans are causing the extinction.
NPR

Practicing 'Extreme Medicine,' From Deep Sea To Outer Space

In his new book, Dr. Kevin Fong explores how humans survive extremes of heat, cold, outer space and deep sea. "We're still exploring the human body and what medicine can do in the same way that the great explorers of the 20th century and every age before them explored the world," he says.
NPR

Fighting Gender Bias: 'Women Need To Be Savvier Than Men'

Host Michel Martin talks to Rachel Dempsey and Joan Williams, co-authors of What Works For Women At Work about why gender bias is still a major problem, and how to fight it in the workplace.
NPR

Sounds Intriguing: The World's Most Interesting Noises

As an acoustic engineer, Trevor Cox has spent most of his career getting rid of bizarre, unwanted sounds. But in The Sound Book, Cox turns up the volume on those sonic oddities. The book explores weird echoes and unexpected noises from around the globe — including "whisper galleries" and a chirping pyramid.
WAMU 88.5

The Enduring Popularity Of Sherlock Holmes

A popular BBC series and a lawsuit over whether his stories are in the public domain are drawing attention once again to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of one of literature's most iconic characters: Sherlock Holmes. We consider the enduring appeal of the "canon" of four novels and 56 short stories featuring Holmes and Watson, and the many interpretations they've inspired on page and screen.

NPR

For Military Couples, It's A Long Recovery 'When We Get Home'

Kayla Williams and Brian McGough met in Iraq in 2003 when they were serving in the 101st Airborne Division. Williams' new memoir, Plenty of Time When We Get Home, describes their homecoming after McGough sustained physical and cognitive injuries during an IED explosion.
NPR

With Fearlessness And A 'Code Name,' Iraqi Helped Navy SEALs

Interpreter "Johnny Walker" accompanied the U.S. military on countless missions in his war-torn home country of Iraq. His memoir, Code Name: Johnny Walker, details his experiences with the SEALs and his family's long path to U.S. citizenship.

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