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Writer Mavis Gallant Portrayed 'Lost Souls' Of Post-WWII Europe

The New Yorker contributor moved to Paris during the reconstruction after World War II, and focused her short stories on often-overlooked European experiences. Gallant died Tuesday.
NPR

The Portrait Of A People In Putin's Russia

Gregory Feifer's book, Russians, draws on hundreds of conversations to paint a portrait of today's Russian people. He discusses his family's past and Putin's popular reign.
NPR

Author James Patterson To Give $1 Million To Bookstores

On Thursday, he announced the names of more than 55 booksellers who are getting some of that money — up to $15,000 each. He tells Renee Montagne about why he's driven to help independent bookstores.
NPR

What It Was Like To Be A Wall Street Recruit After The Bailouts

A reporter shadowed eight young people during their first two years on Wall Street, when the bailouts were still fresh and anti-Wall Street sentiments were running high.
NPR

One Man's Quest To Find The 'Sonic Wonders Of The World'

Acoustic engineer Trevor Cox has traveled around the globe to hear whispering arches and singing sand dunes. Closer to home, he can also explain why your singing sounds better in the shower.
NPR

Is Tyson Foods' Chicken Empire A 'Meat Racket'?

A new book argues that Tyson's system treats farmers like "modern-day sharecroppers." Author Christopher Leonard looks at Tyson's inner workings and the not-so-independent farmers who raise the birds.
NPR

What Honest Abe's Appetite Tells Us About His Life

Abraham Lincoln is known as one of America's greatest presidents. Turns out, he was also a cook who used to join his wife in the kitchen after work. In her new culinary biography of Lincoln, a food historian walks us through his life with stories — and recipes — of what he ate, cooked and served.
NPR

The Secret Operation To Bring Nazi Scientists To America

In the final months of World War II, the United States undertook an enormous effort to attract Nazi scientists to the U.S. Writer Annie Jacobsen's new book, Operation Paperclip, tells the story of that program.
NPR

Through The Mind Of A Novelist, Lincoln Shares His Life Story

Countless books and films have been made about Abraham Lincoln, but not many have been told in his voice. Jerome Charyn's latest novel, a sort of fictional autobiography, does just that. Charyn spoke with NPR's Scott Simon about Lincoln's poetry, depression, and fictionalizing a life.
NPR

'Eliot Ness': Actually Untouchable, Except When It Came To Women

Author Douglas Perry's new book, Eliot Ness: The Rise and Fall of an American Hero, paints a portrait of the legendary lawman as a flawed but genuinely good guy who floundered when away from the excitement of police work. Ness "helped invent the modern police force," Perry says, but couldn't stop drinking and cheating on his wives.

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