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Imagining The Power Of Edouard Manet's 'Very Active Muse'

Maureen Gibbon's new novel, Paris Red, delves into the life of Victorine Meurent, Manet's favorite model and the central figure in some of his most famous paintings.
NPR

It's The Fuzz! Cat Detective Swipes A Claw At Crime In 'William'

When the Mona Cheesa goes missing in Paris, "international cat of mystery" William is called in on the case. Helen Hancocks joins NPR's Scott Simon to talk about William & the Missing Masterpiece.
NPR

'Save Us, Save Us': A Poem For The Migrants Lost At Sea

We asked poet Craig Morgan Teicher to find a poem to illuminate a recent news event. He says the capsized boat in the Mediterranean Sea made him think of Derek Mahon's "A Disused Shed in Co. Wexford."
NPR

Don't Take His Stapler: 'Paper Clip' Author's Passion For Office Supplies

James Ward's new book stems from a lifelong love of Post-it notes, pencils and paper clips. He tells NPR's Melissa Block that they remind him of his school days, when life was less complicated.
NPR

'Pope And Mussolini' Tells The 'Secret History' Of Fascism And The Church

Historian David Kertzer says the Catholic Church lent organizational strength and moral legitimacy to Mussolini's fascist regime. Kertzer recently won a Pulitzer Prize for his book.
NPR

Bradley's 'China Mirage' Portrays A Long-Running U.S. Mistake In Asia

Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep talks to author and historian James Bradley, about his his new book, The China Mirage: The Hidden History of the American Disaster in Asia.
NPR

After 20 Years On The Job, NYC Police Officer Tells His Intense Stories

"Your heart is pounding; your adrenaline is shooting out of your ears," Steve Osborne says. "And you got one second to get it right." He retired from the force in 2003. His memoir is called The Job.
NPR

No Demons, No Angels: Attica Locke Aims For Black Characters Who Are Human

In her new novel, Pleasantville, and on TV's Empire, Locke does her best to avoid simple stories. "You do some good stuff and you do some bad stuff," she says. "We exist in the middle."
NPR

'I Regret Everything': Toni Morrison Looks Back On Her Personal Life

"It's not profound regret," Morrison tells Fresh Air. "It's just a wiping up of tiny little messes that you didn't recognize as mess when they were going on." Her latest book is God Help the Child.
NPR

Unsettling Tales Of Strange Suburbia Echo Through 'The Night'

What do Rapunzel, the Buddha and small-town America have in common? Deceptively safe spaces, says Steven Millhauser. The Pulitzer Prize winner's new short story collection is Voices in the Night.

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