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NPR

The 'Man Who Touched His Own Heart' Changed Medicine

Melissa Block talks to Rob Dunn about his new book, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, a history of science and medicine's efforts to understand the working of the human heart.
NPR

Are We Having Fun Yet? New Book Explores The Paradox Of Parenting

Kids can be magical and maddening. The title of Jennifer Senior's book — All Joy and No Fun — contrasts the strains of day-to-day parenting with the transcendent experience of raising a child.
NPR

From Laundering To Profiteering, A Multitude Of Sins At The Vatican Bank

In God's Bankers Gerald Posner explores the history of money, power and the church. During World War II, he says, the Vatican made money off of the life insurance policies of Jews sent to death camps.
NPR

Should Ray Rice Get A Second Chance? 'Maybe,' Parcells Says

In part two of David Greene's conversation with Bill Parcells, the football coach talks about how he dealt with players' drug use and about redemption for the former Baltimore Ravens running back.
NPR

The Gift Of Eternal Shelf Life: 'Tuck Everlasting' Turns 40

In Natalie Babbitt's celebrated classic, a young girl stumbles upon a secret spring and the family the spring has given eternal life to. Babbitt says she wrote the book to help kids understand death.
NPR

Parcells' Book Details Highs And Lows Of His NFL Coaching Career

Bill Parcells recently recounted his life and career in a memoir, Parcells: A Football Life. David Greene sits down with Parcells to talk about his legacy, and the challenges the league faces today.
NPR

Why Teens Are Impulsive, Addiction-Prone And Should Protect Their Brains

New research shows that teenagers' brains aren't fully insulated, so the signals travel slowly when they need to make decisions. Neuroscientist Frances Jensen, who wrote The Teenage Brain, explains.
NPR

After Father's Death, A Writer Learns How 'The Japanese Say Goodbye'

Lost in a deep depression, Marie Mutsuki Mockett visited a temple owned by her mother's family near Fukushima. There, she found traditions and ways of thought that helped her work through her grief.
NPR

'Ghettoside' Explores Why Murders Are Invisible In Los Angeles

In her new book, journalist Jill Leovy studies the epidemic of unsolved murders in African-American neighborhoods and the relationships between police and victims' relatives, witnesses and suspects.
NPR

In 'Fatherland,' A Daughter Outlines Her Dad's Radicalization

Falling in love with your handsome pen pal, moving overseas to marry him, then finding out he's part of a terrorist organization: That's the Bunjevac family story, told in a new graphic memoir.

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