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NPR

'Listen, Slowly' About Connecting To A Heritage You Don't Know

Rachel Martin talks with National Book Award-winning author Thanhha Lai about her children's book, Listen, Slowly.
NPR

Tumultuous Relationships, But Not Much Gossip, In Langston Hughes' Letters

Poet Langston Hughes was also an "inveterate letter writer," says the co-editor of a new compilation of his correspondence. But if you're hoping to find profound love letters, you'll be disappointed.
NPR

Twice Kidnapped, Photographer Returns To War Zone: 'It's What I Do'

Lynsey Addario was taken captive in 2011 while covering Libya's civil war. With a gun to her head, she says she was thinking, "will I ever get my cameras back?"
NPR

David Axelrod Recounts His Years As Obama's Adviser And 'Believer'

In his new book, the veteran political consultant tells stories about his years at Obama's side. After one debate, Axelrod says, Obama "made clear how he felt about me at that moment, and he bolted."
NPR

Obama's 'Body Man' Looks Back On His Presidential Education

Reggie Love went from playing sports at Duke to working as Barack Obama's personal assistant. His new memoir, Power Forward, describes what he learned on the campaign trail and in the White House.
NPR

We Went From Hunter-Gatherers To Space Explorers, But Are We Happier?

In his book Sapiens, Yuval Noah Harari packs the history of humanity into 400 pages. "In some areas we've done amazingly well," the historian says. "In other areas we've done amazingly bad."
NPR

'Alphabetical' Tells The Story Behind Every Letter, A To Z

There are 26 letters in the English alphabet. But how did they get there, and why do they look the way they do? Michael Rosen looks for answers in his new book Alphabetical.
NPR

An Expansive View Of Vietnam In 'She Weeps Each Time You're Born'

Poet and author Quan Barry — born in Vietnam but raised in America — says she wants her new novel to help get rid of some of the preconceptions Americans have about Vietnam as a quagmire.
NPR

On Board A City Bus, A Little Boy Finds The Route To Gratitude

In Last Stop on Market Street, a little boy goes on a journey with his grandmother. Along the way he meets many interesting passengers and learns to recognize the blessings right in front of him.
NPR

In 'Red Notice,' Success Draws Treachery, Tragedy In Putin's Russia

Robert Siegel talks to Bill Browder, an American financier who was expelled from post-Soviet Russia and saw an attempt to claim his company devolve into a deadly bureaucratic and legal farce.

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