Authors

RSS Feed
NPR

For Jockey Donna Barton Brothers, Horse Racing Runs In The Family

At the Belmont Stakes on Saturday, former jockey Donna Barton Brothers will interview the winner on horseback. Now an analyst for NBC, Brothers won more than 1,100 races before retiring in 1998.
NPR

'Guns Kept People Alive' During The Civil Rights Movement

In his book, This Nonviolent Stuff'll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible, former activist Charles Cobb Jr. says weapons kept people and communities safe during that era.
NPR

John Green's 'Stars' Shines Bright On The Silver Screen

The Fault in Our Stars hits cinemas this week, causing mass outbursts of tears. Author John Green based the character on a real-life girl with cancer — and his own feelings of growing up an outsider.
NPR

Film Critic Kenneth Turan Picks 54 Films That Are 'Not To Be Missed'

Turan says movies are like friends — they speak to you, and can even change your life. In his new book, he shares some personal favorites, and explains why the magic of the movies endures.
NPR

'Burning Down The House' Makes The Case Against Juvenile Incarceration

In her new book, Nell Bernstein says America's juvenile justice system is overdue for reform. Time in jail as a child or teen, she says, is the best predictor of adult criminality and incarceration.
NPR

After Tiananmen Square, New Lives On A New Continent

After the democracy protests were crushed in 1989, many thought China would turn inward. Instead, a million Chinese citizens moved to Africa. Howard French discusses his book China's Second Continent.
NPR

From Lunch (n.) To Balding (adj.), Some Words Are Just 'Bad English'

A new book looks at words that self-appointed linguistic police have declared contraband, like "lunch," which should be a verb, and "balding," a participle formed from an adjective instead of a verb.
WAMU 88.5

Proof: The Science of Booze

Kojo explores the finicky world of booze making and the science behind our favorite cocktails.

NPR

'The Director' Offers A Glimpse Into The Digital Underground

Veteran reporter David Ignatius' new novel explores the sometimes dangerous intersection between hacker culture and the world of intelligence — and offers a prescription for a new kind of agency.
NPR

'How Not To Be Wrong' In Math Class? Add A Dose Of Skepticism

Professor Jordan Ellenberg gives students points for recognizing when they get a wrong answer, even if they can't figure out why. In his new book, he writes that good math is about good reasoning.

Pages