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One Military Family, Two Lost Sons: One To Combat, One To Suicide

In The Invisible Front, journalist Yochi Dreazen tells the story of the Grahams, a close-knit family that lost two sons in the span of a year and then took up the fight against military suicide.
NPR

Q&A: Plumbing The Mysteries Of The Teenage Brain

In Age of Opportunity, psychologist Larry Steinberg applies neuroscience to risk-taking, peer influence, the boredom of high school and other adolescent conundrums.
NPR

Inside The Company That Built The Internet's Highways

Who, or what, is Alca-lu? NPR's Scott Simon talks to Douglas Coupland to answer that question. Coupland's new book is Kitten Clone: Inside Alcatel-Lucent.
NPR

Bio Credits Manson's Terrible Rise To Right Place And Time

California parolee Charles Manson arrived in San Francisco in 1967, when the city was full of young seeking a guru. In Manson, Jeff Guinn says it was the perfect spot for him to enact his cult vision.
NPR

Charles Blow's Memoir Reveals Incidents Of Sexual Abuse And Violence

In a new memoir, New York Times Op-Ed columnist Charles Blow opens up about abuse he has suffered, and inflicted in his life. He tells Michel Martin why he told his story in Fire Shut Up in My Bones.
NPR

'How To Cook Everything Fast'? Bittman Says Skip The Prep

Rachel Martin talks to food writer Mark Bittman about his new cookbook, "How to Cook Everything Fast," which thumbs its nose at the French tradition of having ingredients prepped before you cook.
NPR

For Single Women, An 'Infinite Variety Of Paths'

Getting married used to mark the start of a woman's adult life. But the average age women get married has gone from about 22 to about 27. The shift, says writer Rebecca Traister, has been profound.
NPR

Vaccine Controversies Are As Social As They Are Medical

In writing her new book On Immunity, Eula Biss found that questions about vaccination touch on attitudes about environmentalism, citizenship and trust in the government.
NPR

Hands-Free, Mind-Free: What We Lose Through Automation

Robert Siegel is joined by author Nicholas Carr for a look at the future of automation and automobiles. Carr's new book, The Glass Cage, warns against the rise of automation in our lives.

NPR

Inaugural Poet Recalls A Closeted Childhood Of Cultural Tension

Richard Blanco, who read "One Today" at Obama's inauguration in 2013, explores the collision of sexual, artistic and cultural identity in his new memoir about his childhood in Miami.

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