Arts & Culture

RSS Feed
NPR

Life After Iconic 1976 Photo: The American Flag's Role In Racial Protest

A Pulitzer Prize-winning photo taken during the busing desegregation protests captured a nation. The photographer and subject of "The Soiling of Old Glory" talk about its significance 40 years on.
NPR

In 'Jerusalem,' Nothing You've Ever Lost Is Truly Gone

The house Alan Moore was born in was torn down in 1969 — along with most of the rest of his neighborhood. But in his new novel, Jerusalem, the legendary comics creator brings it all back to life.
NPR

Mae Reeves' Hats Hang At National Museum Of African American History And Culture

Mae Reeves was one of the first African-American business owners in Philadelphia, where she designed hats for Ella Fitzgerald, Lena Horne and Marian Anderson.
NPR

Donald Glover Explores A Surreal Feel In 'Atlanta'

Donald Glover is the creator and star of the new FX show Atlanta. He says he wanted to "give people a feeling that they can't really siphon or make into something else."
NPR

'Shoeless Joe' Author William Patrick Kinsella Dies At 81

The award-winning book was adapted into the beloved film Field of Dreams. The Canadian author is best known for his works about magic — and baseball.
NPR

Not My Job: Nickel Creek Frontman Chris Thile Gets Quizzed On Nickelback

The new host of A Prairie Home Companion has fronted the popular bands Punch Brothers and Nickel Creek — so naturally, we asked him about the much derided Canadian band Nickelback.
NPR

Missouri Theater Embraces Ferguson Echoes In 'Antigone' Production

Some TV stars will perform Sophocles' Antigone on stage in Ferguson, Mo., tonight. The ancient Greek drama is expected to resonate with its theme of an individual's struggle against the state.
NPR

Emma Donoghue's New Novel Follows "The Wonder" Of Starvation

The main character in Emma Donoghue's new novel "The Wonder" is a little Irish girl who refuses to eat. She says she's been kept alive by "manna from heaven." NPR's Scott Simon speaks to the author.
NPR

Laia Jufresa Weaves Together Richness Through Common Grief In Debut Novel 'Umami'

Laia Jufresa's new novel Umami traces a group of neighbors, each getting over a private grief. Scott Simon asks Jufresa about the book and the woman who translated it from Spanish to English.
NPR

In India, A Rich Food Culture Vanishes From The Train Tracks

Once upon a time, most of the millions of people who travel on India's vast train network brought their own food or bought it from vendors at stations. Sharing meals could turn strangers into friends.

Pages