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YouTube Network Plays Well With Latino Audiences

Latinos are more likely than other Americans to watch online videos, but there hasn't been much of an effort to develop special content for them — until now. Mitu is a YouTube network that specializes in lifestyle videos with, as one user puts it, "Latino flair."

'In The Attic': Whips, Witches And A Peculiar Princess

Flowers In The Attic is saucy and scandalous, but author Gillian Flynn says it was the complex, often evil women in the story that kept her turning the pages. Do you have a favorite female villain? Tell us about her in the comments.

Unraveling The Genetic Code That Makes Us Human

In The Violinist's Thumb, writer Sam Kean goes inside our genetic code, looking at the stories written by the fundamental building blocks within us. The book explains things like why some people can't handle drinking coffee and why some human babies are born with tails.

Jo Nesbo's Fiction Explores Oslo's Jagged Edges

The Norwegian author does his best to show NPR's Eric Westervelt that Oslo really does have a seedy side. In his fiction, at least, Nesbo's city is full of shady characters who draw the attention of the reckless, alcoholic detective Harry Hole.

'Savages' Return In 'The Kings Of Cool'

In 2010, writer Don Winslow hit it big with his crime novel, Savages. Although he'd already written 12 novels, Savages was the book that really launched his career. It made it to the top of The New York Times best-sellers list. His new book, The Kings of Cool, is a prequel to Savages.

Not Funny Enough? 'New Yorker' Gives 'Seinfeld' Cartoon A Second Chance

Fourteen years after Seinfeld's Elaine got her fictional cartoon published in The New Yorker, the magazine is asking you to make it funny.

'Who's On First?' The Sign Language Version

Abbott and Costello's famous "Who's on First?" routine still stands as one of the greatest comedy sketches of all time. It was a feat of rapid-fire dialogue, flawless comedic timing and devastating wit.But could you do it without saying a word?

An 'Unlikely Pilgrimage' Toward Happiness

Harold Fry is retired and sedentary — and in no way the sort of person who'd spontaneously decide to walk the length of England to visit a dying friend. Rachel Joyce's new novel, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, follows Fry as he does just that — and finds emotional awakening along the way.

New Edition Includes 39 Different Farewells To 'Arms'

Ernest Hemingway famously told The Paris Review that he'd rewritten the ending to A Farewell to Arms 39 times before he was satisfied. Those endings — and more — are being published in a new addition to the classic novel. But the writer's grandson, Sean, says Hemingway always knew the book would end sadly.