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Fallen 'Lion': How The 'House Of Assad' Came Down

When Bashar Assad inherited the presidency of Syria in 2000, some in the West saw him as a potential reformer. Professor David Lesch of Trinity University met Assad several times. Host Scott Simon speaks with Lesch about his new book, Syria: The Fall of the House of Assad, a clear contrast to his earlier book, which touted Assad as "the new lion of Damascus."
NPR

A Love Song To Family, New York In 'Sunlight'

Mark Helprin's sweeping midcentury novel, In Sunlight and In Shadow, describes a postwar New York in limbo. Helprin borrowed from his own experiences to write this tale of love and familial obligations. "It's all based on what I know and what I knew," he says.
NPR

Big Bird Makes A Campaign Appearance

The Sesame Street character is getting lots of newfound attention since Mitt Romney brought up federal funding for PBS in Wednesday's debate.
WAMU 88.5

Vet Of 'The Apprentice' Heads Taste Of D.C.

Taste of D.C. is run with a very entrepreneurial spirit, thanks to the event producer — native Washingtonian Steuart Martens, a veteran of Donald Trump's "The Apprentice."

NPR

Mandy Patinkin: 25 Years After 'The Princess Bride,' He's Not Tired Of That Line

Mandy Patinkin talks to Melissa Block about The Princess Bride as it turns 25.
WAMU 88.5

The Man Behind "A People's History:" Howard Zinn

We talk with historian Martin Duberman about his new biography of Howard Zinn, which paints an intimate portrait of a complex and private man.

NPR

Hollywood's Horror History — For Kids

There have been a slew of animated family comedies based on horror classics in theaters recently — ParaNorman, Hotel Transylvania and Frankenweenie, to name a few. NPR's Bob Mondello explores the monster movie's transition from scream-inducing to family fodder.
NPR

At College, A 'Pitch Perfect' Musical Comedy

Critic David Edelstein reviews a film that may sound a lot like a campus-bound version of Glee, but has more to it than that label might suggest.
NPR

Interview: MacArthur 'Genius' Junot Diaz

His debut novel — The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao — won a Pulitzer Prize. He was recently named as one of the 2012 recipients of a MacArthur Fellowship. (Rebroadcast from December 2007)
NPR

Memoirist James Wolcott Reflects On The '70s

The Vanity Fair columnist wrote about his early career at the Village Voice in Lucking Out: My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty In the Seventies. (Rebroadcast from November 2011.)

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