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'Drift': Rachel Maddow On Why We Go To War

In her new book, MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow invokes Thomas Jefferson to argue for limited government — at least in the case of the military. She argues that sometimes we got to war because we've invested so much in military strength.
NPR

When Dick Cavett Shared Carnegie Hall With Groucho

Forty years ago Sunday, history was made when talk show legend Dick Cavett introduced Groucho Marx at Carnegie Hall. The night marked Groucho's debut at the famed New York venue and became the record, An Evening with Groucho Marx.
NPR

Three-Minute Fiction: This Week's Featured Stories

More than 6,000 original stories were submitted to this round of Three-Minute Fiction and we're on the quest to select just one winner. Until then, we'll be reading a few of the stories that catch our eyes. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz presents this week's stand out stories: Pilgrims by Catherine Carberry from Metuchen, N.J., and Fireflies, by Delia Read from Fairfax, Calif. To see these stories and others go to npr.org/threeminutefiction.
NPR

Sacrilegious Lunch? The Cuban Sandwich Debate

The city council of Tampa, Fla., recently designated the "Historic Tampa Cuban Sandwich" and specifying its ingredients. From member station WUSF in Tampa, Bobbie O'Brien reports that claim has inspired ridicule from Miami's Cuban community.
NPR

'No Capers In The Kitchen:' Oyster Joint Turns 100

One hundred years ago this past week, Frank and Rose Snock opened their fish restaurant in Philadelphia. A century later, Snockey's Oyster and Crab House is still serving up deep-fried fish fillets, deviled clams and, of course, oysters.
NPR

Brave Sir Robin Ran Away, But The Puzzle Is Still OK

You'll be given a series of categories. For each one, name something in the category beginning with each of the letters of the word "robin." For example, given the category "two-syllable boys' names," the answers could be "Roger," "Omar," "Barry," "Isaac" and "Neville."
NPR

'Birdseye': The Frozen Food Revolution

Before locavores and the "slow food" movement, one man's invention radically transformed how (and what) we eat. In his new book, Mark Kurlansky shows us the curious, roving mind that made TV dinners possible.
NPR

Keith Haring: A Return To His Radiant Roots

Keith Haring arrived in New York City in 1978. Bowled over by the sounds and sights of the city and its burgeoning hip-hop scene, he created a street-art aesthetic that brought him success in just four years. Now, a new exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum showcases rare drawings from those early ears.

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