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'Deadly Monopolies'? Patenting The Human Body

In a new book, medical ethicist Harriet Washington details how genes and tissues are increasingly being patented by pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Those firms, she argues, are focused more on their profits than on the medical needs of patients.
NPR

Going Under The 'Boardwalk' With Michael Shannon

The actor plays a righteous federal agent who succumbs to all sorts of temptations on the HBO drama Boardwalk Empire. To build the character of Nelson Van Alden, he says, he worked out an elaborate back story about the agent's childhood.
NPR

Moreno, Leguizamo Talk Latin Life In 'Hollywouldn't'

They rose to fame 40 years apart, but Rita Moreno and John Leguizamo say they both faced some of the same hurdles in a town that sometimes just sees brown — and they both got over them with a signature sense of humor.
NPR

Was It A Cat I Saw? (Nope: It Was A Palindrome)

"Madam, I'm Adam!" is child's play. Master palindromist Barry Duncan creates works of art that are paragraphs long and read the same forward and backward. The secret, he says, is finding the middle, "the letter on which the palindrome is going to pivot and turn."
NPR

Products R Us: Are We 'Brandwashed'?

Did you really think the apples you lifted out of a wooden crate at a grocery store came from a local farm? Think again. As Martin Lindstrom explains in his new book, Brandwashed, companies use many tricks to manipulate our minds and persuade us to buy.
NPR

On Broadway, John Turturro Offers Three For One

Actor John Turturro is best known for roles in movies by Spike Lee, the Coen Brothers and others, but this month he's making his debut as a Broadway director. Turturro is directing three one-act plays by three big-name writers: Ethan Coen, Elaine May and Woody Allen.
NPR

Old-Time Radio Fans Sign Off

After 36 years, the annual Friends of Old-Time Radio Convention will go silent. Radio dramas don't have the audiences they once had, losing out to other distractions. Listeners can still tap into the rich catalogue of The Lone Ranger, Sherlock Holmes and many others via the Internet, though, so the work lives on. Scott Gurian spent time with the group on their last day.
NPR

Arts Giving Is Up, But Hold The Applause

While the overall U.S. economy seems to be stuck in neutral, one bright spot is that charitable giving to the arts is up 5 percent more than last year. It's good news, but a new study cautions that much of that support serves audiences that are wealthier and whiter than the country as a whole.

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