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'Hecklevision:' Leave Your Phone On At This Movie

Portland, Ore., is one of the cities trying something new in movie theaters — encouraging audience members to heckle via text messages. The jokes and comments appear on the big screen. Robert Siegel talks with Erik Henriksen of the Portland Mercury alternative weekly about this week's offering — Point Break.
NPR

Networks Hope Comedy Will Be King Of TV This Fall

This week, the big broadcast TV networks are in New York City to sell their new shows to the ad buyers. Melissa Block talks to TV critic Eric Deggans about the shows we'll see in the fall.
NPR

Thank The Patron Saint Of Bakers For This Cake Today

Pictures of Saint Honore or (Saint Honoratus) from church iconography reinforce his baker background. He's holding his wooden peel, often with a few delicious-looking loaves of crusty French bread nearby.
NPR

'The Dictator' Rules With A Satirist's Fist

There was Ali G, Borat and Bruno — and now, in The Dictator, Sacha Baron Cohen has a new character to add to his repertoire: the capricious ruler of an oil-rich country who travels to the U.N. to assert his right to have nuclear warheads.
NPR

Yul Kwon, From Bullying Target To Reality TV Star

Korean-American Yul Kwon went from being bullied in school, to being named one of People magazine's 'Sexiest Men Alive.' The Yale-educated lawyer catapulted to stardom when he won the reality TV show Survivor. He talks with host Michel Martin about his efforts to change the game for Asians and how they're reflected in media.
NPR

Just What's Inside Those Breasts?

In her new book, Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History, Florence Williams offers her take on why breasts are getting bigger and developing earlier, why tumors seem to gravitate toward the breast, and how toxins from the environment may be affecting hormones and breast development.
NPR

A Fleeting Memory Of Carlos Fuentes

The Mexican literary legend's passing this week spurred a particular recollection from NPR's Linton Weeks, who spent time with him in 1995.
NPR

In Writing, Fuentes Shed Light On Poverty, Inequality

Carlos Fuentes, one of the most influential Latin American writers, died Tuesday at a hospital in Mexico City at the age of 83. He was instrumental in bringing Latin American literature to an international audience, and he used his fiction to address what he saw as real world injustices.
WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, May 16

The Music Man, the belly of a killer whale, and the Mayan underworld.

NPR

Remembering Mexican Writer Carlos Fuentes

Robert Siegel talks to literary critic Alan Cheuse, a writing teacher at George Mason University, about the legacy of Carlos Fuentes. The Mexican writer died Tuesday at the age of 83.

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