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Video Pick: Jack-O-Lantern 2.0

Marc and Chris, the founders of Maniac Pumpkin Carvers, share tips on how to bring your pumpkin to the next level this Halloween. Their pumpkins, which go for between $150 - $400, rarely end up on stoops. You are more likely to find them in Tiffany's ads and in window displays.
NPR

Jimmy Fallon's Giant List Of 'Thank You Notes'

Fallon is thankful for slow walkers, people named Lloyd and the word "moist." The comedian and host of Late Night collects more than 100 nuggets of gratitude in his book Thank You Notes. He talks with Terry Gross about giving thanks and doing impressions.
NPR

'Margin Call': A Movie Occupied With Wall Street

This fiscal thriller, starring Kevin Spacey, Zachary Quinto and Demi Moore, is set during one day in 2008, as a group of brokers try to prevent their firm from going belly up. David Edelstein says that given the headlines, the film's timing couldn't be better. (Recommended)
WAMU 88.5

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Oct. 21

Spooky hands, Poe with few props and Boo at the Zoo.

NPR

Fairy-Tale Adaptations: It's Ever After, All Right

Two new network dramas — and a substantial slate of Hollywood movies — make it clear that there's something eternally enchanting about the folk tales we keep retelling.
NPR

A Coconut Cake From Emily Dickinson: Reclusive Poet, Passionate Baker

Emily Dickinson discussed baking in many of her letters — evincing both her trademark wit and a zest for life that belies the common image of her as a depressed figure.
NPR

Poet Marie Howe On 'What The Living Do' After Loss

"Poetry holds the knowledge that we are alive and that we know we're going to die," poet Marie Howe tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. One of Howe's most famous poems, "What the Living Do," was recently included in The Penguin Anthology of 20th-Century American Poetry.
NPR

Real 'Sybil' Admits Multiple Personalities Were Fake

In Sybil Exposed, Debbie Nathan explores the life of Shirley Mason — the psychiatric patient whose life was portrayed in the 1973 book and 1976 TV movie. Mason later admitted to her psychiatrist that she'd made the whole thing up — but not before the story manufactured a psychiatric phenomenon.

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