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NPR

The Modjeska: A Star On Stage, Sweetly Remembered

There once was a candy maker who was infatuated with an actress. Now, there's a candy shop in Louisville, Ky., that's been selling his tribute to her for decades.
NPR

'Techie Computer Programmer Guy' And The Website Reddit Deliver The News

Shortly after the Colorado shootings, a Denver 18-year-old named Morgan Jones started a thread on the social media site Reddit. It built through the night into a minute-by-minute chronicle of tragedy.
NPR

Neuroscientist Turned Crime Solver in "Perception"

"Perception," a new TV show on TNT, stars Eric McCormack as an eccentric neuroscience professor who helps the FBI solve crimes between teaching classes. Series co-creator and executive producer Ken Biller describes the show, and explains how the writers work to get the science right.
NPR

Soul Food Fans Say Goodbye To 'Queen' Sylvia

Sylvia Woods of the legendary Harlem soul food restaurant, Sylvia's, died yesterday at age 86. She made chicken and waffles cool long before today's current crop of retro hipsters decided to take it on.
NPR

When Zombies Attack Lower Manhattan

Colson Whitehead's novel Zone One is a post-apocalyptic tale of a Manhattan crippled by a plague and overrun with zombies. He explains that he created the novel, in part, to pay homage to the grimy 1970s New York of his childhood.
NPR

Michael Connelly: L.A. Reporter To Mystery Novelist

It has been more than 20 years since author Michael Connelly first introduced readers to the character who has become a fixture in his best-selling crime novels: Detective Hieronymus "Harry" Bosch. We'll tour Los Angeles the way he and Bosch see it. This piece initially aired August 24, 2007 on Morning Edition.
WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, July 20

Events for the District’s great outdoors (if you’re not going to see The Dark Knight Rises).

NPR

In Troubled Times, A 'Dark Knight' Returns

The Dark Knight Rises places Batman in contemporary New York amid familiar economic and social unrest. NPR's Bob Mondello says the film is as big and loud as expected. The biggest surprise is how satisfying an end it provides to Christopher Nolan's trilogy.

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