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A Pulpit For The Masses: YouTube, Christians Click

Many have turned to YouTube to express their views about the message of Jesus. At least one has reached biblical proportions. With more than 18 million views, "Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus" has become a sensation.
NPR

The Risks And Rewards Of Practicing Yoga

Yoga can be extremely beneficial, but it also can be quite dangerous. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist William Broad examines the pleasures and pitfalls of the practice in his latest book, The Science of Yoga.
NPR

'Beautiful Forevers': Surviving Mumbai Slum Life

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Katherine Boo chronicles the hardscrabble lives of some of Mumbai's poorest — and most inventive — people in her first book, Behind the Beautiful Forevers.
NPR

Dickens At 200: A Birthday You Can't 'Bah Humbug'

For nearly two centuries, Charles Dickens' colorful characters and memorable expressions have worked their way into the vernacular. The prolific 19th-century English novelist left behind 989 named characters and two dozen novels full of the pathos and comedy of London's rich and poor.
WAMU 88.5

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Feb. 7

Elephant Room at Arena and Dragons, Nagas and Creatures of the Deep at the Textile Museum.

NPR

Is White, Working Class America 'Coming Apart'?

In his new book, Charles Murray, co-author of the controversial The Bell Curve, argues that in an increasingly economically stratified America, the white working class is slipping behind.
NPR

Super Bowl XLVI: Dogs In Ads, Madonna At Halftime

With an ad costing about $3.5 million per 30 seconds, the stakes were high as advertisers pulled out all their tricks to wow viewers on Super Bowl Sunday. To review the most talked about ads, guest host Jacki Lyden hears from Tampa Bay Times TV and media critic Eric Deggans, and Detroit News TV critic and writer Mekeisha Madden Toby. They also discuss Madonna's halftime show performance.
NPR

Comedian Baratunde Thurston On 'How To Be Black'

Thurston is the son of a pro-black, pan-African mother. He straddled the worlds between his troubled neighborhood in Washington, D.C., and the elite halls of Harvard University. He speaks with host Michel Martin about some of his witty and profound thoughts on race. His new book How To Be Black is part of Tell Me More's memoir series for Black History Month.
NPR

Meryl Streep: The Fresh Air Interview

Meryl Streep won a Golden Globe for her performance as Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady. She talks about preparing for that role, her other films and how her perceptions of herself have changed over the years.

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