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A Compelling, Chutzpadik History Of 'Jews And Words'

"Ours is not a bloodline, but a text line," say father-daughter author team Amos Oz and Fania Oz-Salzberger. Their new book, Jews And Words, explores the significance of text in the Jewish tradition. "For thousands of years, we Jews had nothing but books," Oz says. "They became part of the family life."
NPR

Hispanics Call For Kennedy Center Honors

After 35 years and 186 artists, only two honorees have been Hispanic — Placido Domingo in 2000 and Chita Rivera in 2002. "When you paint that picture and you leave the Latino artist community out of it, there's a huge hole," says Felix Sanchez, president of the National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts.
NPR

Jake Tapper Of ABC News Plays Not My Job

We've invited ABC's longtime chief White House correspondent to answer three questions about a real tapper: Bill "Bojangles" Robinson.
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Debating Government Arts Funding

As the showdown over averting the "fiscal cliff" heats up, funding for the arts isnt making headlines. But arts organizations fear big cuts, while conservatives hope to make their case for the separation of art and state. We explore the future of public arts funding.

NPR

Nuns Top '50 Shades' In Classical Music Smackdown

Fifty Shades of Grey: The Classical Album has been on Billboard's Classical Traditional Albums chart for 11 weeks, most recently in the top slot. But the album has been bumped this week by The Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles — a group of singing nuns from Missouri. The Benedictines' album is called, Advent at Ephesus. Melissa Block and Robert Siegel have more.
NPR

An Existential Guide For When You're Really 'Lost'

Astrophysicist Adam Frank doesn't usually read self-help books, but something about Walter Percy's existential optimism in Lost In The Cosmos actually changed his outlook on life. Do you have a favorite self-help book? Tell us in the comments below.
NPR

That's So Random: The Evolution Of An Odd Word

NPR's Neda Ulaby investigates the etymology of random, a word comedian Spencer Thompson calls "the most misused ... of our generation." It turns out that Thompson's frustration is a bit misplaced — random has been around since the 14th century, and its usage shows how life, like language, evolves.

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