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Ebert: A 'Life' Still Being Lived, And Fully

Film critic Roger Ebert is famous for arguing about movies on TV with Gene Siskel. Now that cancer surgeries have left him without the ability to speak, Ebert has found a new voice online. Melissa Block visits him at his Chicago home to talk about his memoir, Life Itself.
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'Citizen Kane' At 70: Film School In A Box For The Serious Cinephile

Bob Mondello looks at the 70th Anniversary edition of what many consider the greatest film of all time: Citizen Kane.
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A Teenager's Photo That Helped Inspire Libya's Revolutionaries

Teenager Zehra Tajouri's photo of her sister holding a defaced Libyan flag, taken on the first day of the uprising last February, became an online symbol of the Libyan revolution.
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An Interrogator Writes 'The Inside Story Of 9/11'

Former FBI agent and interrogator Ali Soufan talks about dysfunction and rivalries inside the government's counterterrorism agencies that led to missed opportunities — as well as the ineffectiveness of enhanced interrogation techniques on collecting intelligence.
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'Porgy And Bess,' Adapted For Modern Times

Classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz just attended two productions of Porgy and Bess: an operatic performance at Tanglewood and a musical-theater version in Cambridge, Mass. He says it can work either way, "as long as Gershwin's great score remains its heart and soul."
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Dads: Helping Boys Form Deep Friendships

A recent parenting conversation about boys friendships featured moms and researcher Niobe Way, who finds that boys crave and value deep friendships with each other, but American ideas of masculinity make these bonds tougher to keep as boys grow older. Now two fathers and a young male weigh in on the research and discuss their own friendships.
NPR

'Wonderstruck': A Novel Approach To Picture Books

Brian Selznick's cinematic approach to storytelling is an artful experiment in narrative and illustration. Writing and drawing his books, he says, is "like going through a treasure map backwards."
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Tina Brown's Must-Reads: The Women Of The World

The Newsweek editor looks at how women helped end the civil war in Liberia, how they're changing the state of marriage throughout Asia and the rise of Christine Lagarde to the top of that notoriously male-dominated institution, the International Monetary Fund.

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