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Seth Meyers' Prime-Time Political Parody

For Fresh Air's Late Night week, we listen back to a 2008 interview with Seth Meyers, head writer at Saturday Night Live, and the co-anchor of Weekend Update. Meyers will be taking over from Jimmy Fallon on Late Night, now that Fallon is moving to The Tonight Show. A longer version of this interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 29. 2008.
NPR

Was Miley Twerking Or Just Trying?

Miley Cyrus' provocative performance at the MTV Video Music Awards got some people clapping, but many more fingers wagging. Host Michel Martin talks about the cultural implications of twerking.
NPR

Mystery Series' Portly P.I. Peels Back The Layers Of Delhi Society

Tarquin Hall's mystery novels, starring the Punjabi detective Vish Puri, are a merry introduction to India's cultural and culinary delights. Puri, who calls himself the subcontinent's "most private investigator," tackles corruption, forbidden love and the clash of science and superstition.
NPR

Move Over, Pot Stickers: China Cooks Up Hundreds Of Dumplings

Dumplings are a huge part of Chinese culinary tradition, and restaurants there cater to the nation's obsession with a dazzlingly array of dumpling shapes and fillings, including green frogs stuffed with bullfrog meat and a flock of birds filled with roasted Beijing duck.
NPR

Area Man Realizes He's Been Reading Fake News For 25 Years

The Onion, which turns 25 on Thursday, was founded by two Madison, Wis., college students as a local satirical newspaper "intended mainly to ... sell pizza coupons," says its editor-in-chief. But the self-proclaimed "America's Finest News Source" became much more than that.
NPR

The Latest Frontier In Gourmet Salt, From The Lowest Point On Earth

Spas and beauty products have long touted the health benefits of floating in the buoyant Dead Sea waters and slathering its thick black mud on your skin. Now an Israeli company is promoting Dead Sea salt as a healthful gourmet product, in part because of its high mineral content.
NPR

Taking A Closer Look At Milgram's Shocking Obedience Study

In the early 1960s, psychologist Stanley Milgram conducted a controversial study in which participants were led to believe they were administering painful, high-voltage shocks to other subjects. Gina Perry, author of Behind the Shock Machine, says the study has "taken on a life of its own."
NPR

Reaching Across What's Broken, 'Short Term' Fix Or No

After college, director Destin Daniel Cretton took a job at a short-term care facility for at-risk teenagers. His time there became the basis for Short Term 12, a film that took two awards at this year's South by Southwest Festival. (Recommended)
NPR

Freedom Singer: 'Without Music, There Would Be No Movement'

The Freedom Singers, Bob Dylan, and Joan Baez were some of the people who provided the soundtrack at the March on Washington. The Freedom Singers' Rutha Mae Harris tells host Michel Martin why the civil rights movement couldn't exist without music.
NPR

To Grow Sweeter Produce, California Farmers Turn Off The Water

California's small producers of tomatoes, grapes and other crops are increasingly taking up dry farming, which involves growing crops without watering them for months. The technique, which obviously saves water, can produce more flavorful crops.

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