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NPR

Think You Can Pitch? Creatives Break Down Their Art

When creative thinkers develop a concept, they must convince others their idea is worth backing. Pitching skills are needed in the newsroom, and in the worlds of entertainment, fundraising and invention. But what makes a pitch successful?
NPR

Residents Tout Detroit As City Of Ideas, Arts

Member station WDET asked listeners to share what they want the world to know about their city. Tell Me More ends its Motown-based broadcast with comments from some of Detroit's biggest fans.
NPR

In Italy, Art As A Window Into Modern Banking

With a nod to the current financial crisis in Europe, an Italian art exhibition looks at the often controversial role that banking played in expanding trade and helping usher in the Renaissance.
WAMU 88.5

'Art Beat' With Tara Boyle, Jan. 31

Really Really New Theatre, Art from the Attic and Photography of the ‘Burbs.

NPR

America's Supernanny Shares Key To Raising Kids

Films such as Nanny McPhee and Mary Poppins have romanticized the nanny role, but there's no magic umbrella for the star of the reality TV show America's Supernanny. Deborah Tillman visits a home-in-crisis during each episode, helping kids and parents behave. She talks to host Michel Martin.
NPR

Life's Common Things At Heart Of K'Jon's R&B Music

Ahead of Tell Me More's Tuesday broadcast from Detroit, the program highlights one of the city's very own — singer and songwriter K'Jon. His 2009 song, 'On the Ocean,' set the record for the longest run on Billboard's R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. He speaks with host Michel Martin about his hometown, career and upcoming album.
NPR

'An Available Man': Love After Loss

Hilma Wolitzer's finely observed comedy of manners follows the romantic misadventures of recently widowed 62-year-old Edward Schuyler as he re-enters the dating pool with a splash.
NPR

'Consent' Asks: Who Owns The Internet?

In Consent of the Networked, Rebecca MacKinnon investigates how the governments and corporations that control the digital world can impinge on civil liberties.

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