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Rapping Biology? Why Science And Hip-Hop Works

Engaging students in science class is no easy task but using hip-hop may be one way to get their attention. Research scientist Danielle Lee uses hip-hop to bridge the gap between culture and science.
NPR

Teddy Roosevelt's 'Bully Pulpit' Isn't The Platform It Once Was

Roosevelt described the power of the presidency to shape public opinion as "The Bully Pulpit." That's also the title of a new book from presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, in which she explains the unique relationships Roosevelt forged with reporters.
NPR

With Fading Memory, Terry Pratchett Revisits 'Carpet People'

At the age of 59, the British science-fiction writer was diagnosed with a form of Alzheimer's. Now he's publishing an edited version of a book he first wrote when he was 17. He can't read because of his disease, but Pratchett continues writing — with the help of dictation software.
NPR

If The Internet Is Your Canvas, You Paint In Zeros And Ones

In early October, Benjamin Palmer dropped $3,500 at Phillips auction house in New York. His acquisition? Ifnoyes.com — the first website to be sold at an established auction. It highlights the growing acceptance and appeal of artwork that lives in a virtual space.
NPR

Regardless Of The Answer, Stay Staid

Each answer is a two-word phrase consisting of two homophones starting with the letter S. For example, given the clue "remained dignified," the answer would be, "stayed staid."
NPR

Scientist's Scuba Trip Sparks Search For 'Vanished' WWII Plane

On Sept. 1, 1944, a B-24 bomber went down in the South Pacific. The wreckage, and the airmen, seemed to disappear. Almost 50 years later, a scientist on vacation in Palau found an airplane wing and went on an obsessive, decade-long quest to find what happened to the plane. Author Wil S. Hylton joins NPR to discuss his new book on the mystery.
NPR

Knitting In Real Time Is Just Right For Norway's Slow TV

Huge audiences are tuning in to Norway's Slow TV, which broadcasts ordinary activities — like a seven-hour train journey, an eight-hour fire — in real time. Creating a sweater on air, from shearing to spinning to knitting, could set a world speed record — but then the segment would be too short. Host Rachel Martin speaks with programming director Rune Moklebust about the Slow TV movement.
NPR

What Happens When You Touch A Stranger

In a series called "Touching Strangers," the photographer Richard Renaldi asked complete strangers walking down the streets of New York City to pose together, making it look like they were family members, friends or lovers. Renaldi speaks with host Rachel Martin about the project.
NPR

'Open Secret': When Everyone Knows Who Your 'Real' Mom Is, Except You

When he turned 18, Steve Lickteig learned that the woman he knew as his older sister was actually his mother, a secret his other siblings and most of his small Kansas town had known and kept from him. In a new documentary, Lickteig tries to understand how he was left in the dark for so long.
NPR

A Male Belly Dancer, Social Activism On Instagram, 'Thriller'

Ozy co-founder Carlos Watson tells NPR's Arun Rath about an Instagram artist with a social conscience, one man breaking into the world of belly dancing, and the timeless innovation of Michael Jackson's "Thriller."

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