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Cork Versus Screw Cap: Don't Judge A Wine By How It's Sealed

Remember screw caps on jugs of wine? These days, many winemakers have wholeheartedly embraced the screw tops — not just for their ease of use, but for the way they seal the wine's taste. Now many consumers are learning to look past the caps' former downmarket reputation.
NPR

Netflix Built Its Microgenres By Staring Into The American Soul

Fresh Air tech contributor Alexis Madrigal counted 76,897 microgenres on the online streaming and DVD rental service, many of which are bizarrely personalized (Violent Action Thrillers Starring Bruce Willis, Tearjerkers From The 1970s). He says the company "knows you."
WAMU 88.5

Making Music Behind Bars At A Maryland Prison

Wayne Kramer once played guitar in a rock band; now, he's using those skills to help prison inmates hone their musical and social skills.

NPR

Visible And Invisible: 'Servants' Looks At Life Downstairs

Author Lucy Lethbridge explores the history of British servants through their diaries, letters and memoirs. She says, "What I found particularly fascinating was how ... butlers were so butlery"; the old caricature of the clever manservant and the silly master is one "butlers have appeared to play to the hilt."
NPR

Apologies Needed For Beyonce's Song?

Critics are slamming Beyonce for using an audio clip from the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster in her new song "XO." Was she being insensitive, or artistic? Host Michel Martin hears from the beauty shop ladies: journalists Bridget Johnson and Keli Goff, and Maria Teresa Kumar of Voto Latino.
WAMU 88.5

The History Of Black Barber Shops

Modern black barber shops are civic, cultural and business institutions in many major cities. Their history, however, is complicated, shifting from places where only white men were served to the democratic social spaces of today in just over a century. We consider the political and social movements brought that change about and the role these shops play in communities now.

NPR

Isaac Asimov Right On With Some 2014 Predictions

Fifty years ago, science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov foresaw gadgets that "relieve mankind of tedious jobs" like machines that heat water and prepare coffee. He predicted smartphones — noting we'd be able to see and hear someone we call, and be able to look at photos on the same screen.
NPR

'Fresh Prince' Actor James Avery Dead At 68

James Avery, the actor who played the Honorable Philip Banks — also known as Uncle Phil — on the TV show The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, has died.
NPR

Gary Shteyngart's 'Little Failure' Is An Unambivalent Success

In 1979, Gary Shteyngart's family moved from Leningrad to Queens. Three decades later, he wrote a memoir about growing up in a Russian immigrant family in New York. Reviewer Meg Wolitzer says the book is full of rich, gratifying writing as well as pride, exuberance and sophisticated humor.
NPR

The Incredible Versatility Of Photographer John Dominis

Over the course of a few decades at Life magazine, Dominis not only worked in just about every photographic genre but also seemed to have mastered them. He died Monday at age 92, leaving behind an archive that's hard to comprehend.

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