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A Film Producer On The Rise, Hollywood Gets Biblical

Ozy.com co-founder Carlos Watson talks about a rising film producer getting his big break this year, and the swath of films on the horizon dealing with biblical or Greco-Roman times.
NPR

And The Best Supporting Actor Award Goes To ... Side Dishes

In the Oscar-nominated film The Wolf Of Wall Street, just about everything is over the top – including the side dishes. But it turns out, a memorable scene involving extravagantly priced sides isn't so far from the truth. These days, chefs are giving these former afterthoughts starring roles of their own – and they come with big price tags to match.
NPR

Not My Job: Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin Gets Quizzed On The Future

Goodwin's an expert on presidents of the past, so we'll quiz her on presidents of the future — three questions about leaders from science fiction.
NPR

Living, And 'Forgiving,' In A Brilliant Writer's Orbit

Jay Cantor is a hard author to nail down. He's written about topics as wide-ranging as Che Guevara and Krazy Kat. His latest work expands his range even more, fictionalizing the lives of four of Franz Kafka's friends and lovers. It's called Forgiving the Angel, and Cantor tells NPR's Lynn Neary it's a book born out of gratitude.
NPR

Sundance Festival Celebrates 30 Years Of Independence

The Sundance Film Festival is celebrating its 30th year this week. NPR's Lynn Neary commemorates the anniversary with Eric Kohn, the chief film critic for Indiewire, an independent film news site.
NPR

'Lunch' Gets Boxed Out: India's Oscar Pick Controversy

India's Film Federation chose a movie called The Good Road as the country's best foreign language film submission to this year's Oscars — but it didn't make the Academy's short list, and many say another film, festival favorite The Lunchbox, should have been chosen. Film critic Aseem Chhabra tells Lynn Neary that the federation is quite secretive, and no one really understands its process.
NPR

One Last Tale Of The City In 'Anna Madrigal'

Armistead Maupin's famous series Tales of the City winds down with one last story about Anna Madrigal, the transgender landlady of 28 Barbary Lane. Maupin tells NPR the series originally grew out of his attempts to write a nonfiction piece about the heterosexual pickup scene at his local Safeway.
NPR

For Cheating Husbands, A Little Dose Of Revenge

On Tuesday, France's president held an uncomfortable news conference, beginning with a question about his personal life. Rumor has it he's been cheating on the French first lady with a younger actress. In light of this affair, author Sarah Wendell recommends revisiting an old classic: The First Wives Club.
NPR

Rachel Joyce's 'Perfect' A Flawed, But Hopeful Novel

Rachel Joyce's new novel offers two parallel narratives: the 1972 story of Byron, an anxious schoolboy, and the present-day account of Jim, a supermarket worker who has spent most of his life in institutional care. But critic Ellah Allfrey says that the novel is made up of two distinct and unequal parts.
NPR

A Strange Composition: Classical Music Meets Bioterror In 'Orfeo'

Richard Powers' new novel tells the story of an avant-garde classical composer who finds himself dabbling in DNA. He "gets obsessed with finding music inside of living things," Powers explains, and, as a fugitive, ends up leading officials on a low-speed chase.

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