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NPR

A Bestselling Book Becomes An HBO Movie About A 'Dynamic Moment'

Commentator Eric Deggans says the HBO film Game Change, based on a much-discussed book about the 2008 campaign, may inform the way we see the 2012 election.
NPR

'Lifespan': What Are The Limits Of Literary License?

When an intern accused author John D'Agata of embellishing the facts in an essay, the two began wrestling over the writer's responsibility to the truth, and even the meaning of truth itself. The Lifespan of a Fact is the real-life record of their debate (or is it?).
NPR

'Fragile Beginnings': When Babies Are Born Too Soon

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy's son Patrick was born prematurely and died of a respiratory problem that is now routinely treated. In the 50 years since, extraordinary advancements have been made in the field of neonatal intensive care. Dr. Adam Wolfberg explores those triumphs in his new book.
NPR

In 'Mosquita Y Mari,' A Tale Of Self And Community

The story of budding love between two Chicana teens, it's the first narrative feature by a Chicana director to screen at the Sundance Film Festival. Nishat Kurwa of Turnstyle News reports on the movie's personal and community origins.
WAMU 88.5

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Mar. 8

Sounds of East Africa, a few dizzying debates, and D.C. steel.

NPR

'Les Bon Temps Rouler' To The Auction Block

Need a costumed Mardi Gras mannequin or a bedazzled 1974 Gremlin? On Thursday, collectors can bid on some of the memorabilia from the former Kenner Mardi Gras Museum. The museum is about a half-hour drive from the French Quarter — not a convenient trip for many tourists — and declining attendance caused it to close its doors.
NPR

'Audacious' Black Ballerinas Had To Be On Point

Black ballerina Joan Myers Brown grew up in a time of rigid segregation, both in life and dance. Brenda Dixon Gottschild, author of Joan Myers Brown and the Audacious Hope of the Black Ballerina, talks with NPR's Michel Martin about how Brown tackled racial barriers in the ballet world.
NPR

Public Apology: The 'Mea Culpa' Matching Game

When a public figure such as Rush Limbaugh makes a mistake, the public wants an apology. Of course, there's more than one way to finesse that message. Play NPR's Matching Game to see how some famous folks issued a mea culpa after they stumbled.
NPR

'Audacious' Black Ballerinas Had To Be On Point

Joan Myers Brown is a black ballerina who grew up in a time of rigid segregation, both in life and dance. Host Michel Martin speaks with Brenda Dixon Gottschild, the author of "Joan Myers Brown and the Audacious Hope of the Black Ballerina."

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