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Sherlock's Expiring Copyright: It's Public Domain, Dear Watson

The famous sleuth has discovered that U.S copyright law is anything but elementary. A federal judge recently ruled that elements of the Sherlock Holmes characters are now both licensed property of the Doyle estate and in the public domain. The Doyle estate plans to appeal the decision.
NPR

'You Can't Be This Furry' And Other Life Lessons From Gary Shteyngart

In Little Failure, the novelist recounts his emigration from the USSR to the U.S. when he was 7. For the first few years, he says, he would sit alone in the school cafeteria, talking to himself in Russian "in this gigantic fur hat and fur coat." It wasn't long before a teacher advised, "Children won't play with you if you have that much fur on."
NPR

In Gaming, A Shift From Enemies To Emotions

Many of these "empathy games" focus on smaller, more personal stories about everyday people. Today's developers grew up with the medium, says one designer. For them, it's "natural to consider that you can have a game about anything."
NPR

CIA Lawyer: Waterboarding Wasn't Torture Then And Isn't Torture Now

John Rizzo, who guided the CIA through more than three decades of crisis and controversy, has written a new memoir called Company Man. He talks with NPR's Renee Montagne about the origins of the infamous "enhanced interrogation techniques" that emerged after the Sept. 11 attacks.
NPR

Sandwich Monday: The Ignatius R

For this week's Sandwich Monday, we brave the record-breakingly cold streets of Chicago to try the Ignatius R, a record-breakingly enormous sandwich from Jerry's Sandwiches. It's a potato bun wrapped around pretty much everything you can imagine.
NPR

Looks Like The Paleo Diet Wasn't Always So Hot For Ancient Teeth

When hunter-gatherers started adding grains and starches to their diet, it brought about the "age of cavities." At least, that's what a lot of people thought. But it turns out that even before agriculture, what hunter-gatherers ate could rot their teeth. The problem: At least some of these ancients had a thing for acorns.
NPR

Amazon Locavore: Meet The Man Putting Brazilian Food On The Map

Alex Atala's Sao Paulo restaurant, D.O.M., is ranked among the top 10 restaurants in the world. His cuisines, which showcases irridescent insects, delicate jungle herbs and other ingredients from the Amazon, is pushing the frontiers of gastronomy.
NPR

In High-Drama Parody, Will Ferrell Reveals 'Spoils Of Babylon'

The book, written in the 1970s, was made into a miniseries and never saw the light of day — until now. Actually, everything about The Spoils of Babylon is pure fiction. It's a parody of the big, bloated miniseries of the 1970s and '80s, complete with forbidden love between a sister and her adopted brother.
NPR

Eating Tea And Other Food Predictions For 2014

Say so long to chia seeds and cronuts — so 2013 — and get ready to welcome freekeh, an ancient, fiber-rich grain. Eating local goes into overdrive, and cauliflower is poised to become the new Brussels sprout.
NPR

'On Such A Full Sea': A Fable From A Fractured Future

Chang-Rae Lee is an award-winning author best known for his novels Native Speaker and The Surrendered. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Lee about his latest book On Such a Full Sea, a futuristic dystopian novel set in a declining America that's been repopulated by Chinese immigrant workers.

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