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Philip Seymour Hoffman On Acting: An 'Exhausting' And 'Satisfying' Art

We listen back to interviews with Hoffman from 1999 and 2008, when he told Fresh Air's Terry Gross that carrying the emotional life of a character could be "burdensome." He was found dead on Sunday at age 46.
NPR

Seinfeld, Coca-Cola and Cheerios: Which Super Bowl Ads Scored?

The Seattle Seahawks dominated the Super Bowl, but for some people, the ads stole the show. Host Michel Martin speaks with NPR TV critic Eric Deggans to find out which commercials hit the mark, and which fell short.
NPR

'After Midnight,' And The Cotton Club Is Swinging Again

The legendary Harlem nightclub and the artists and music it's synonymous with are being celebrated in a new Broadway revue. Jeff Lunden talks to cast members and the creators about the pleasures and perils of paying homage to a place with a problematic history.
NPR

Philip Seymour Hoffman: An 'Uncanny' Actor Of Stage And Screen

In his award-winning role in the film Capote, film critic Roger Ebert wrote that the performance wasn't so much an imitation as it was a channeling of "a man whose peculiarities mask great intelligence and deep wounds." Hoffman, 46, was found dead on Sunday.
NPR

Following Oil Boom In N. Dakota: A Cultural Blooming?

The oil fields of western North Dakota are bringing vast economic opportunity to a region that just 10 years ago was in decline. Yet, this vitality is rough around the edges and high art and culture are rare commodities. One organization is trying to change that by sending two professional writers into towns most impacted by the boom to conduct creative writing workshops.
NPR

'Unnecessary Woman' Lives On The Margins, Enveloped In Books

Writer Rabih Alameddine's says his new novel offers a Middle Eastern perspective rarely seen in the U.S. The 72-year-old title character lives alone in Beirut, consumed by translating her favorite books into Arabic. The Unnecessary Woman explores the "push-pull" between our solitary and social lives.
NPR

A Century Ago Today, Chaplin Made His Film Debut — In A Dud

The silent-film comic was a flop in the 13-minute Making a Living. But only a few days later, he'd introduce his iconic Little Tramp character — and take the first step toward immortality.
NPR

Marijuana-Laced Treats Leave Colorado Jonesing For Food-Safety Rules

From sodas to truffles to butter, foods infused with THC — the chemical in marijuana that gives you a high — are already for sale in Colorado. But the federal government still considers pot illegal, so the state has to create from scratch its own system to regulate these foods.
NPR

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Oscar-Winner, Found Dead At 46

The actor, whose repertoire includes an eclectic array of challenging roles, won a best actor Oscar for the title role in the 2005 film Capote.

NPR

Amazon Plunges Into Christian Publishing With Waterfall Imprint

Amazon has joined the legions of mainstream publishing houses with a religious imprint, Waterfall Press. But Waterfall isn't just religious — it's specifically Christian. Yale seminarian Win Bassett tells NPR that Christian publishing is a billion-dollar business that includes some surprising authors.

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