Arts & Culture | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Arts & Culture

RSS Feed
NPR

Film Festival Turns Lens To African Homeland

The 19th New York African Film Festival kicks off Wednesday, with a wide selection of films exploring ideas of home and homeland. Guest host Viviana Hurtado speaks with the festival's founder Mahen Bonetti, and documentary filmmaker Laura Gamse, who is showing her film The Creators about South African artists.
NPR

At The Met: A Middle East Transition, Centuries Ago

When Islam was established in the seventh century, it spread rapidly to regions ruled by Orthodox Christians centered in Constantinople. There was confrontation, but also coexistence, among the different cultures and religions. A new exhibit looks at the pivotal period, with an eye toward the region's modern upheaval.
NPR

D'Oh! Springfield In 'Simpsons' Was Based On Town In Oregon All Along

Matt Groening tells Smithsonian magazine that the show's location is based on Springfield, Ore. He credits the idea of naming it Springfield to the hit TV show Father Knows Best.
WAMU 88.5

‘Art Beat’ With Sean Rameswaram, April 11

Family drama, from Scotland to Brooklyn.

NPR

Encore! Encore! Applauding The Literal Showstopper

NPR's Bob Mondello looks back at classic examples of the showstopping theatrical phenomenon that's fallen out of fashion — the encore.
NPR

'Winding Up' As The Mets' Knuckleball Pitcher

New York Mets pitcher R.A. Dickey is currently the only knuckleball pitcher in the major leagues. His new memoir, Wherever I Wind Up, explains how his life — and career — have mimicked the unpredictable trajectory of the difficult pitch he throws game after game.
NPR

Arizona Artist Looks To Space For Celestial Verses

As part of Tell Me More's series for National Poetry Month, host Michel Martin shares a poetic tweet from writer and artist Heather Feaga from Phoenix, Arizona. Listeners are invited to tweet original poems of 140 characters or less to #TMMPoetry.
NPR

Carole King, From Doo-Wopper To Chart Topper

Singer-songwriter Carole King started young: She was just 15 when she founded a doo-wop group with her classmates. The act never took off, but King eventually became one of the biggest-selling artists of all time. She tells the story of her career so far in a new memoir, A Natural Woman.

Pages