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NPR

The Historic Howard Theatre: Past And Future

The Howard Theatre in Washington, DC was built in 1910, and just about every top black entertainer performed on its stage. But it had to shut its doors once the neighborhood fell on hard times. Now it has reopened, and host Michel Martin talks with Jimi Smooth, a musician who was an usher at the Howard in the early '60s.
NPR

Zombies Capture Author's Imagination

As part of Tell Me More's series for National Poetry Month, host Michel Martin shares another poetic tweet. Tuesday's tweet comes from author Stacey Graham of Bluemont, Va. Listeners are invited to tweet original poems of 140 characters or less to #TMMPoetry.
NPR

Alec Baldwin Campaigns For More Arts Funding

Actor Alec Baldwin will ask Congress today to increase funding for the National Endowment for the Arts. The N-E-A is receiving about 147-million dollars this year... about 20-million less than its 2010 level. Steve Inskeep talks to Baldwin about his latest funding push, which kicked off last night with a lecture at the Kennedy Center for the advocacy group "Americans for the Arts."
NPR

A Poem Store Open For Business, In The Open Air

Zach Houston makes a living on the streets of San Francisco by composing poems on a manual typewriter. Give him a topic, and he'll pound out a poem in a matter of minutes — hopefully for a donation that will help him stay in business.
WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, April 17

Three completely different things.

NPR

I Want To Be Surprised With Language, Curator Says

For Tell Me More's poetry series, Muses and Metaphor, host Michel Martin speaks with writer and poet Holly Bass to review her picks from listener submissions. The series is in celebration of National Poetry Month, and all month long, listeners are invited to send in poetic tweets, no longer than 140 characters, via Twitter, using the #TMMPoetry.
NPR

Interpreting Shariah Law Across The Centuries

In his new book, Heaven on Earth, English barrister Sadakat Kadri describes how early Islamic scholars codified — and then modified — the Shariah laws that would govern how Muslim people lead their daily lives. He then reflects on the present day, describing how today's religious scholars interpret the Shariah.

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