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Rebel Memoirs: Three Confessions From The Edge

Reading about dysfunction can be dismal. But done well, memoirs can be more excellent than exhibitionist. Author Marion Winik recommends three edgy, honest, and provocative tell-alls.
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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Jan. 17

One-act plays, dark surf rock and a tribute to the Boss

NPR

Get 'Lost' In J.J. Abrams' Latest Show 'Alcatraz'

Two more shows to add to your 2012 list: Justified, which returns to FX Tuesday night for its third season, and Alcatraz, a new Fox drama and the latest from Lost producer J.J. Abrams. TV critic David Bianculli explains why they're both worth watching.
NPR

Legal Scholar: Jim Crow Still Exists In America

Michelle Alexander says that many of the gains of the civil rights movement have been undermined by the mass incarceration of blacks in the war on drugs.
NPR

Classic Films Don't Always Translate Into Must-See TV

Television has a long history of trying to make classic films work as a series. Some are successful — think M*A*S*H — while others are flops. Critic Eric Deggans reviews the latest attempts to turn successful movies into TV show: The Firm and Napolean Dynamite.
NPR

The Art Of The Modern Movie Trailer

A good trailer can make or break an opening weekend. Like movies, they can take years to finish — and their producers face a constant pressure to stay fresh.
NPR

Golden Globes: Comedy Vies With Drama This Season

The Golden Globes have equally good comedy and drama masks this year. Sunday's musical or comedy contenders make up a strong bunch that could give their best-drama cousins at the Globes a run for their money come Oscar time.
NPR

Post-9/11 Life As A 'Non-Enemy Combatant'

Alex Gilvarry's dark first novel occupies a wacky continuum that begins at the center of haute couture, and ends in solitary confinement. The book is From the Memoirs of a Non-Enemy Combatant and it looks at one man's trip into military detention. Host Rachel Martin talks with Gilvarry about his book.
NPR

Righting The Wrong On MLK's Statue

"I was a drum major for justice, peace and righteousness." That sentence is inscribed on a statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in Washington, D.C. The problem? King never said those words, at least, not exactly. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar has given the National Park Service a deadline to correct the inscription. Host Rachel Martin has more.

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