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'Bioshock Infinite': A First-Person Shooter, A Tragic Play

BioShock Infinite uses a mix of history and fantasy to create a world dominated by a racist fundamentalist Christian cult. The latest installment in the video game series drew praise from critics as proof that games could be more than just computer graphics. Can the genre really reach the heights of great art?
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Nora Ephron's 'Lucky Guy' And Tom Hanks Make Their Broadway Debuts

Lucky Guy is one of the spring theater season's most highly anticipated plays. It stars Hanks, in his first Broadway performance, as tabloid journalist Mike McAlary. Director George Wolfe calls Ephron's last play "a love poem to journalism."
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Star Of MTV's 'Buckwild' Found Dead

The bodies of Shain Gandee, 21, his uncle David Gandee, 48, and a third person were found inside an SUV near Sissonville, W.Va. There was no sign of foul play. Shain Gandee was one of the most popular cast members on the MTV reality show.
NPR

Mining Books To Map Emotions Through A Century

Anthropologists find that the use of "emotional" words in all sorts of books has soared and dipped across the last century, roughly mirroring each era's social and economic upheavals. And psychologists say this new form of language analysis may offer a more objective view into our culture.
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In Digestion: Mary Roach Explains What Happens To The Food We Eat

With books like Stiff and Spook, Roach has built a reputation for making unpalatable subjects entertaining. In her new book, Gulp, she tackles the human digestive system, from the mouth on down. Along the way, she gets a sedation-free colonoscopy and goes on location for a fecal transplant.
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Listening Back To An Interview With Phil Ramone

Ramone started out as a sound engineer for Lesley Gore, and went on to work with Simon and Garfunkel, Barbra Streisand and Frank Sinatra. He died Saturday at the age of 79. Fresh Air remembers him by listening back to a 1995 interview. He talks about losing old demos and being mistaken for a member of The Ramones.
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Cable And Corruption In Southern California

The Galloway brothers, Clinton and Carl, spent most of the 1980s fighting to get poor minorities in Southern California access to cable television. It was a struggle that took them from City Hall to the Supreme Court. Clinton Galloway talks with host Celeste Headlee about his new memoir, Anatomy of a Hustle: Cable Comes to South Central L.A.
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Newark Doctor Aims To Be Education's 'Michael Jordan'

Dr. Sampson Davis had a tough upbringing in New Jersey. But then he turned his life around, went to medical school, and became an E.R. doctor. He now treats patients in the same town where he grew up. Dr. Davis talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about his new memoir, Living and Dying in Brick City: An E.R. Doctor Returns Home.
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Viewer Discretion: Deciding When To Look Away

Decisions like whether to watch a grisly injury on replay underscore the fact that with less gatekeeping and more personal choice, we're all stuck with wrangling our own curiosity.
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Book News: Shakespeare Was A Tax Evader And Food Hoarder, Researchers Say

Also: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie disses V. S. Naipaul; a new biography of Derrida; and the best books coming out this week.

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