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WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Aug 1

Going small, horrific retail, and powerful playwrights.

NPR

Grotesque Horror Through A Kid-Sized Window

Stephen King's It showed Erin Morgenstern that the demons and ghouls of childhood stories don't hit the road just because you grow up. Have you read something that both scared and enticed you? Tell us about it in the comments.
NPR

Who Makes Stuff Up, And Why They Do It

Jonah Lehrer lost his job at the respected New Yorker magazine after admitting that he fabricated quotes by Bob Dylan in his book. He joins a long list of writers, journalists, bloggers and scientists who've crossed the line from fact into fiction.
NPR

Facing The Fiscal Cliff: Congress' Next Showdown

In December, Congress is poised for another showdown on the deficit and taxes, in what is now being called the fiscal cliff. In his new book Red Ink, David Wessel explains how the federal budget got to the point where it is today — and where to go from here.
NPR

'Olimpicamente': In Praise Of Feistiness And Big Feet

Poet Monica de la Torre takes inspiration from Mexican taekwondo champion Maria del Rosario Espinoza. "I am dumbfounded and positively moved by Maria del Rosario's improbable story," the poet says.
WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, July 31

Charlotte Dumas in Northwest and bachata in Bethesda.

NPR

Fresh Air Remembers Actress Lupe Ontiveros

Lupe Ontiveros, known for her role in the 1997 film Selena, died Thursday at the age of 69. Fresh Air remembers the Latina actress, who was often called on to play the role of the maid, with excerpts from a 2002 interview.
NPR

Getting Old Is Hard, Even (And Especially) For Models

Supermodels open up about aging in a youth-obsessed industry in the HBO documentary About Face: The Supermodels Then and Now. "I really insisted that I not be retouched in Playboy," says Carol Alt. "... I'm 49 years old, and that was the point ... I let every bump and flaw show."
NPR

A Portrait Of A Country Awash In 'Red Ink'

Wall Street Journal economics writer David Wessel's new book, Red Ink, lays out in unsparing terms the way the U.S. government spends money, who pays what in taxes, and why politicians can't seem to agree on ways to reduce the potentially catastrophic deficit.

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