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Who Is She? Just One Of The Most Popular Songs Ever

Written 50 years ago this summer, it's just been dubbed the second-most recorded pop song ever. It's been covered by everyone from Frank Sinatra to Amy Winehouse to the Yale Whiffenpoofs. What song is it? Here's a hint: It's Brazilian and it's about a girl.
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What's Travel Writer Paul Theroux Reading?

We're asking people this summer what's on their nightstand. Author Paul Theroux, probably best known for his travel writing, gives us his summer reading pick: Rough Stone Rolling, by Richard Lyman Bushman.
NPR

How The Olympic 'Dream Team' Came To Be

Twenty years ago, a dozen basketball players were dispatched to Barcelona to represent the United States in the Olympics. The team was something the world of sports had never seen before, and probably never will again. Guest host David Greene talks with Jack McCallum about his new book on the players, Dream Team.
NPR

Since When Does Summer Taste Like Doughnuts?

Saltwater taffy makes sense in a beach town. Snow cones and popsicles also seem like great summer treats. So commentator Bonny Wolf is wondering why the mainstay of so many beach and summer resort towns is the doughnut shop.
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Jennifer Weiner: 'Best Thing' Would Be Equality

Author Jennifer Weiner's new novel draws on her experience creating and running a television show. Weiner writes bitingly about the experiences of women in Hollywood writers' rooms — and she's also very vocal about the disrespect female authors face from literary critics.
NPR

If You Want In The Mix, You've Got To Split The Six

For each six-letter word given, rearrange the letters to make two three-letter words that rhyme. Example: For the word "tweets," the pair of rhyming three-letter words would be "wet" and "set."
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'Agent Garbo,' The Spy Who Lied About D-Day

Juan Pujol Garcia lived a lie that helped win World War II. Nicknamed for the enigmatic actress Greta Garbo, Garcia's own performance was so convincing he fooled Hitler himself.
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Manju: A Taste Of Home For Seattle's Japanese Community

Manju are traditional Japanese dough buns, often filled with sweet bean paste, that are best eaten fresh. A Seattle native recently opened a manju bakery to replace one he remembers fondly from childhood.
NPR

Abraham Lincoln 'Impeached.' Wait, What?

Did Abraham Lincoln subvert the Constitution? That's the startling premise of a new novel from Yale Law School professor Stephen Carter, in which Lincoln survives that terrible night at Ford's Theatre, only to face an impeachment trial two years later.
NPR

'After Murder': Learning To Live After You've Killed

Can a murderer ever be redeemed? That's the question journalist Nancy Mullane takes on in her new book, Life After Murder. Over the past few years, Mullane has made dozens of trips to California's San Quentin prison to interview men locked up for committing heinous crimes.

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