Arts & Culture | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Arts & Culture

RSS Feed
NPR

Branding 'Brave': The Cultural Capital Of Princesses

If you want to sell something to little girls right now, just put a princess on it. Disney princesses alone fuel a $4 billion industry, and Pixar's movie Brave is sure to give that a boost. But it isn't all singing birds and sunshine — some wonder if the princess trend is becoming too niche.
WAMU 88.5

The Dictionary Of American Regional English (Rebroadcast)

The fifth volume of the Dictionary of American Regional English covers "slug" to "zydeco." It is part of a 50-year project to capture regional dialects. Joan Hall, chief editor of the dictionary, and linguist Ben Zimmer join Diane to discuss what our language reveals about who we are.

WAMU 88.5

A Strategist Balances Partisan Politics And Artistic Anarchy

Peter Loge lives a life of contrasts, dividing his time between political consulting and making abstract art.

NPR

Fresh Air Remembers Film Critic Andrew Sarris

Andrew Sarris, who popularized the auteur theory and was called the "dean of American film critics," died on Wednesday. He was 83. Fresh Air remembers the longtime film critic for The Village Voice with excerpts from a 1990 interview.
NPR

'The Newsroom' Caught Up In A Partisan Divide

Aaron Sorkin's new HBO series follows the inner workings of a cable news show that sets out to challenge our hyperpartisan, 24/7 news culture. But critic John Powers says Sorkin has created a show that replicates much of what it thinks it's opposing.
NPR

'Nephew Tommy' On The Art Of The Prank Phone Call

This summer, Tell Me More talks to some of today's most popular comedians. Host Michel Martin first speaks with Thomas Miles, or "Nephew Tommy." He entertains millions with prank phone calls, as one of the co-hosts of the popular Urban Radio program, The Steve Harvey Morning Show. Advisory: This segment may not be comfortable for some listeners.
NPR

Native American Comic Living The 'Indigenous Dream'

Comedian Charlie Hill has been doing standup for more than three decades. Considered a hero in the Native American community, Hill says that he's achieved his dreams — but that the American dream is still out of reach for many Native Americans.

Pages