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A Frat Of Their Own: Muslims Create A New Space On Campus

Alpha Lambda Mu filled a void last year, becoming the first Muslim fraternity in the country. Its founder says he just wanted to provide Muslim American men a place to be themselves.
NPR

From Uganda To The Midwest, 'All Our Names' Draws Portraits Of Love

Dinaw Mengestu is known for writing about the immigrant experience, but his latest novel takes a slightly different tack: It's about love born out of loneliness and need, and complicated by war.
NPR

Meet The Murdering, Kidnapping Imposter Who Fooled Walter Kirn

In 1998, the novelist befriended a rich, eccentric, art-loving Rockefeller — or so he thought. Kirn explores the man's lies in Blood Will Out: The True Story of a Murder, a Mystery, and a Masquerade.
NPR

Affordable Care Act Isn't Perfect, But It's A 'Pretty Good Structure'

In his new book, Ezekiel Emanuel explains "how the Affordable Care Act will improve our terribly complex, blatantly unjust, outrageously expensive, grossly inefficient, error prone system."
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Not My Job: Drummer Stewart Copeland Gets Quizzed On Police Tactics

We ask the former drummer of the 1980s band The Police three questions about questionable tactics used by actual police.
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Review: 'The Grand Budapest Hotel'

Bob Mondello looks at Wes Anderson's latest cinematic curiosity, The Grand Budapest Hotel.
NPR

Too Many Artists, Too Little Time: The Problems And Promise Of The Whitney

It's time again for the show that people love to hate: the Whitney Biennial, an overview of American art. Critics often trash it, but as Karen Michel says, this year's showcase has a few surprises.
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A Ukrainian Conscience Lost By Complicity, Recovered By Remorse

Anthony Marra recommends Everything Flows by Vasily Grossman as a way to understand the events unfolding in Ukraine.
NPR

From One Dream To Another, 'The Returned' Shows Promise

Eric Deggans talks with author Jason Mott about the year's hottest book-to-TV translation, Resurrection. The series, a rare television show starring a black man, is based on Mott's book, The Returned.
NPR

Barbershop Guys Dig Into Hollywood Beef

Screenwriter John Ridley won an Oscar for 12 Years A Slave, but he's being criticized for an old essay about black people. The barbershop guys give their own speeches on the topic.

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