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NY Fashion Week, From Google Glasses To Harnesses

Top designers are showing off their spring 2013 collections in New York. Host Michel Martin gets a glimpse of what's hot and what's not with Isabel Wilkinson, editor of the fashion section for The Daily Beast. They also discuss Michelle Obama and Ann Romney's fashion picks at the conventions.
NPR

Master Violin Maker Feels Economy's Sour Notes

Artists and musicians often take the first hit when the economy takes a turn for the worse. Host Michel Martin speaks with writer Amanda Abrams about one violin maker's struggle to make ends meet in tough times. Abrams chronicles Howard Needham's story in this week's Washington Post Magazine.
NPR

Strawberry Fields For 'MasterChef' Christine Ha

Christine Ha is the first blind contestant on FOX's reality TV show MasterChef, and she's competing in the finals on Monday night. For Tell Me More's occasional "In Your Ear" series, Ha shares some of the songs she turns to for inspiration.
NPR

'End Of Men' Heralds New Era Of Female Dominance

Women have fought tirelessly to establish equal footing for themselves in relationships, politics and the workplace — and according to writer Hanna Rosin, they've finally arrived. "We have to redefine what we mean by 'head of the household,'" she says.
NPR

Why Knockoffs Are Good For The Fashion Industry

In The Knockoff Economy, Kal Raustiala and Christopher Sprigman say that in the world of fashion, copycats make styles go in and out of vogue faster. Copying breeds competition, Raustiala says, and that makes clothes cheaper for consumers.
NPR

For Museum, Long-Lost Picasso Is Too Costly To Keep

For more than 40 years, Pablo Picasso's Seated Woman with Red Hat went unnoticed in the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science's storage area. Now that it's resurfaced, the Indiana museum says it can't afford to insure the multimillion-dollar artwork.
NPR

Michael Chabon Journeys Back To 'Telegraph Avenue'

Michael Chabon's eighth novel, Telegraph Avenue, delves deeply into issues of art, race and sexuality. The book started with a "very tiny world," Chabon says, a vinyl record shop not unlike a Berkeley store that inspired him in the late '90s.
NPR

Istanbul, A City Of Spies In Fact And Fiction

Turkish officials recently arrested several suspected Iranian spies. But these cases are but a pale echo of Turkey's heyday as a mecca for spies. During World War II, Istanbul was a crossroads that swarmed with agents. It has inspired authors from Eric Ambler to John le Carre — a tradition that continues today.
NPR

Are All Young Artists 'Post-9/11' Artists?

In the 40 Under 40 exhibit at the Smithsonian's Renwick Gallery, young artists bring modern-day technology together with old-fashioned craft techniques. Curator Nicholas Bell says it is a worldview and artistic approach "defined by the angst, the unease, the trepidation, the difficulties of the 21st century."

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