Arts & Culture | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Arts & Culture

RSS Feed
WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Sept. 20

Anil Revri's 'Wall for Peace'

Enemies, peace, and dancing by memory.

NPR

Debunking The 'Myth Of The Muslim Tide'

In his new book, Doug Saunders says there are those who believe immigration and high birth rates will make Muslims a majority in Europe in coming decades — and their hostility to Western values makes them a threat. Saunders tells Fresh Air that such fears are based on inaccurate assertions of fact.
NPR

'Life Of Objects' Tells A Cautionary WWII Fairy Tale

Susanna Moore tells the saga of an ambitious girl, a family's artistic fortune and a world at war. Young heroine Beatrice Palmer is whisked off to Berlin where she is put to work packing up priceless artwork in a wealthy family's mansion.
NPR

6 Quirky Tie-Ins To The 2012 Election

This election year, everybody's getting in on the action. Along with the usual posters, T-shirts and lapel pins, other presidential election tie-ins are popping up across the land. Here are a few of the most unusual political marketing ploys that caught our eye.
Thursday, September 27, 2012

Human Rights Film Series at Katzen Arts Center

Katzen Arts Center: Daniel Lobo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/198

Four exceptional documentaries will be shown at the 13th annual Human Rights Film Center at American University's Katzen Arts Center.

NPR

Claire Danes: Playing Bipolar Is Serious Business

The actor says she researched her Emmy-nominated role as bipolar CIA agent Carrie Mathison by watching YouTube videos of people in manic states. She returns to television in the second season of Showtime's Homeland on Sept. 30.
WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Sept. 19

Drawing inspiration, classics, lines, and whatever else comes to mind.

NPR

Dr Pepper's Evolution Ad Strikes A Nerve With Some Christians

Some creationists are taking offense at Dr. Pepper's new take on a famous 1965 evolutionary drawing called "March of Progress." And the outrage and "counteroutrage" are spreading across social media.
NPR

In 'Season,' One Plantation's Double Murder Mystery

Attica Locke was inspired to write her new novel after attending an interracial couple's wedding on a plantation. The Cutting Season tells the story of two murders set a century apart. The past, Locke says, "walks with us still."
NPR

Becoming 'Anton,' Or, How Rushdie Survived A Fatwa

In 1989, Iran's leader issued an edict that sentenced Salman Rushdie to death for writing the novel The Satanic Verses. Rushdie reflects on the fallout from that order — from the years spent in hiding to the alias he created to avoid detection — in a new memoir called Joseph Anton.

Pages