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E-Books Destroying Traditional Publishing? The Story's Not That Simple

Conventional wisdom says e-books are destroying the traditional publishing business model. But the story's not that simple. For one thing, flexible pricing allows publishers to hold what amount to one-day-only sales on any given title — which means more people will discover that book.
NPR

Libraries And E-Lending: The 'Wild West' Of Digital Licensing?

About three-quarters of public libraries offer e-books, according to the American Library Association. But finding the book you want to read can be a challenge when every publisher has its own licensing rules for libraries — and several major houses don't sell e-books to libraries at all.
NPR

Margaret Atwood's Brave New World Of Online Publishing

Charles Dickens wrote many of his greatest works in serial form, but serial publishing has fallen by the wayside since his day. Now, it's being revived online, and Margaret Atwood is publishing a future-dystopia novel called Positron in installments via the literary website Byliner.
NPR

Change Is The Only Constant In Today's Publishing Industry

The publishing industry has been in flux for years. First chain stores, then Amazon, then e-books — all combined to create dramatic change. Industry consultant Mike Shatzkin outlines some of the biggest changes, like the recently announced merger of Penguin and Random House.
NPR

At The End Of The Day, Cliches Can Be As Good As Gold

Cliches are often criticized as the most overused and contemptible phrases in the English language. But writer Hephzibah Anderson says there are times when cliches are not only useful, but also create a sense of camaraderie. And sometimes, she writes in Prospect magazine, only a cliche will do.
NPR

Aaron Sorkin: The Writer Behind 'The Newsroom'

HBO's new behind-the-anchor-desk drama follows in the footsteps of Sorkin's hit series The West Wing. "I like writing about heroes that don't wear capes or disguises," he says.
NPR

In Rapid-Fire 2012, Memes' Half-Life Fell To A Quarter

Internet memes used to stick around for months on end (remember "Charlie Bit My Finger"?). But in 2012, the shelf-life of an Internet sensation became increasingly fleeting. Funny videos and games are now enjoying only brief moments in the cultural spotlight before they're forgotten.
NPR

'Law & Order' Meets Tom Clancy In Dick Wolf's First Novel

The Law & Order creator's detective fiction debut is set in New York after the killing of Osama bin Laden. Although The Intercept borrows stylistically from Wolf's television background, he says novel writing allows him "to tell bigger stories on a bigger canvas."
NPR

'Hyde Park': An FDR Portrait That's More Fiction Than Fact

Hyde Park on Hudson tells the story of a love affair between Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his distant cousin Margaret "Daisy" Suckley. Historian Geoffrey Ward evaluates the accuracy of the new film and finds it lacking. "It's a very odd film," he says.

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