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NPR

Immigration Comments Touch Nerve With 'Diverse' Canadians

Host Michel Martin and editor Ammad Omar dip into Tell Me More listeners' letters to get their take on the week's top stories. This week, Canadian listeners take exception to a comment made on Thursday's show.
NPR

Making Peace With The Bible By Writing It Out Word For Word

Reading the Bible from cover to cover might seem like a heavy task. But what about writing it? Host Michel Martin speaks with Phillip Patterson, who is just two verses away from writing out the whole King James Bible. He talks about how he kept the faith in spite of loss and illness.
NPR

Book News: Microsoft Rumored To Be Interested In Buying Nook

Also: rare footage of William Faulkner; drag and Virginia Woolf; and the art of translation.
NPR

Unpacking Foreign Ingredients In A Massachusetts Kitchen

NPR listener Laurel Ruma picked up some odd ingredients during her travels. London-based chef Yotam Ottolenghi helps her concoct recipes with them for Morning Edition's Cook Your Cupboard series.
NPR

On 'Hicksploitation' And Other White Stereotypes Seen On TV

Writer Eric Deggans argues that it's just as easy to stereotype white, working-class people as folks of color. He's wondering: Why haven't we seen stronger protests of shows that stereotype whites?
NPR

At The Movies, A Swirl Of Style And Substance

Special effects date back to the dawn of film, but with today's tools moviemakers can put pretty much anything on-screen — which has NPR film critic Bob Mondello thinking about how movie style affects movie substance.
NPR

Could You Talk To A Caveman? Scientists Say It's Possible

Researchers at the University of Reading are speculating that today's languages share a common root dating as far back as the last Ice Age. Words like "mother," "man" and "ashes" are categorized as "ultraconserved," meaning they are survivors of a lost language from which many modern tongues are descended.
NPR

In Newsrooms, Some Immigration Terms Are Going Out Of Style

In April, the Associated Press decided the word "illegal" should only be used to describe actions, not people. It's one of several major news outlets that have been reconsidering how to refer to people who are in this country illegally.
NPR

What We Can Learn From The Viral Spotlight On Charles Ramsey

A compelling television interview with Charles Ramsey, who helped save three women held in captivity in Cleveland, quickly became an online meme in the vein of Antoine Dodson and Sweet Brown. Slate's Aisha Harris and Jonathan Capehart of The Washington Post discuss what Harris has called the viral trend of the "hilarious black neighbor."
NPR

Book News: Hacker Leaks Part Of 'Sex And The City' Author's New Book

Also: poems by New York City taxi drivers; Imelda Marcos and the power of spectacle; and USA Today is losing books staffers.

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