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Designer Ozwald Boateng On Being The 'Statesman of Cool'

Designer Ozwald Boateng became the first black designer on London's prestigious Savile Row. Since then, he's made quite the name for himself; his tailored suits cost as much as 40 grand. Host Michel Martin speaks with Ozwald about his career, style and Ghanaian heritage.
NPR

With Space-Bound Hubbies, 'Astrowives' Became 'First Reality Stars'

On April 9,1959, the U.S. introduced its first astronauts, and then launched their wives into the spotlight. In The Astronaut Wives Club, Lily Koppel looks at how seven women coped with the attention and anxiety that came with being married to the space race.
NPR

Book News: Illinois School Board Restores 'Perks Of Being A Wallflower'

Also: A comic book for the blind; Salvador Dali's great, trippy Alice in Wonderland illustrations.
NPR

What Kids Are Reading, In School And Out

Some experts are concerned that both in-school assignments and the books kids read for pleasure may not be challenging them enough.
NPR

Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg: Friends Till 'The End'

Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg met as adolescents on the Vancouver bar mitzvah circuit — and soon after began writing the script for what would become the movie Superbad. Their new project is This Is the End, a disaster-movie spoof in which the Rapture hits home in Hollywood.
WAMU 88.5

Oprah Winfrey Gives $12 Million To Museum of African American History

The media mogul has already given $1 million to the museum now under construction, and the $12 million gift will get her name on a 350-seat auditorium.

NPR

Post Recession, Architects Return To The Drawing Board

While some jobs are coming back in this economy, the market for many architects remains tough. There were nearly 220,000 people working in the field in 2008. Today, more than 25 percent of those jobs are gone.
NPR

Jeannette Walls' 'Silver Star' Lacks Spunk And Direction

The novel is about two sisters, aged 12 and 15, who travel cross-country after their mother abandons them. Reviewer Meg Wolitzer says that not only the characters are adrift in this book, the story itself seems unsure of what it wants to be.
NPR

Summer No Longer A Time Of Drought For Television

It used to be that there wasn't much new on TV in the summer, the assumption being that people were outside and not glued to their televisions. But this summer, there are more than 100 shows starting up or starting new seasons. Audie Cornish talks to Eric Deggans of The Tampa Bay Times about what to watch.

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