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Oscar-Winner Emma Thompson Revives 'Peter Rabbit'

After more than 80 years, Emma Thompson's The Further Tale of Peter Rabbit brings Beatrix Potter's beloved character back for a romp around the Scottish countryside — and lots of rule breaking. Thompson says Peter Rabbit's "disrespect for authority" is one of the things she loves about him. (This piece initially aired on October 11, 2012 on Morning Edition.)
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David Sedaris Reads From His 'Santaland Diaries'

It's tradition! Writer and humorist David Sedaris reflects on his short tenure as Crumpet the Elf at Macy's. Sedaris first read the "Santaland Diaries" on Morning Edition in 1992 — and instantly, a classic was born.
NPR

Hitler's Hot In India

All over India, an unusual name has been popping up on signs in restaurants and businesses. Indians have a growing affinity for the murderous dictator, and the connections between him and the subcontinent may explain why.
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The Movie Guy Raz Has 'Seen A Million Times'

On his last day hosting weekends on All Things Considered, host Guy Raz tells us about the movie he could watch a million times: Richard Linklater's School of Rock. "It's just a perfect movie," he says.
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Unwrap 'Christmas' For Your Gift

Every answer is a word that can be formed from the letters of "Christmas." You'll be given two words as clues. The first one can precede the answer word, and the second one can follow it — in each case to complete a compound word or familiar two-word phrase.
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Romantic Reads From Shakespeare To Steampunk (Heavy On The Steam)

Writer Eloisa James gathers the best of 2012's romance subgenres. Expect lots of heat, in the most unexpected places and with some unlikely people: From the military to the paranormal, and from Shakespeare to steampunk, James' picks for the year skip across oceans and genres.
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Survived The Mayan Apocalypse? Here Come The Radish People

Each Dec. 23, they descend upon Oaxaca's main plaza: giant root vegetables carved into human figures and other vivid forms. The Night of the Radishes is a major tourist draw these days, but it all started with Spanish missionaries in the 1500s. When a new religion and imported crops met indigenous woodcarvers, a novel art form was born.
NPR

The Joy Of Salt Licking: Contest Turns Farm Animals Into Fine Artists

Eastern Oregon is known more for ranching than abstract sculpture, but some residents are venturing into the world of fine art. For the last five years, Whit Deschner has been organizing the Great Salt Lick Contest, which gathers salt blocks artfully licked by local farm animals.

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