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NPR

Eastwood And His Chair Not Only Entertainers On The Trail

Mitt Romney has Clint Eastwood and that now-famous empty chair on his side. But the Republican presidential nominee isn't the only one getting entertainment industry shoutouts this week.
NPR

Hey, I Know That One: How SongPop Got Millions Of Players Naming That Tune

Neda Ulaby looks at SongPop, a rapidly growing music-identification game.
NPR

Against The Odds, A 'Miracle Boy Grows Up'

Ben Mattlin was born with a condition called spinal muscular atrophy. Many infants with the disease don't live past age 2, but Mattlin went on to attend Harvard, get married and have kids. "I had this dumb idea from childhood that I could do anything anybody else could do," he says.
NPR

Transcript: Clint Eastwood's Convention Remarks

Actor and director Clint Eastwood's address to the Republican National Convention, as delivered.
WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Aug. 31

Say goodbye to summer with a few great gifts and some Rock Creek blues.

NPR

Facebook Game 'SongPop' Draws On Players' Nostalgia

SongPop is the fastest growing social game on Facebook right now. Around the world, four million people a day play it, according to the company. It's a social name-that-tune kind of game but it's about nostalgia and connection as much as it's about music.
NPR

Hannibal, Mo.: Art Abounds In Twain's Hometown

Mark Twain found the inspiration for his classic works while growing up in the river town of Hannibal, Mo. Today, there's a new set of artistic characters in Twain's boyhood home; the town of 18,000 boasts a vibrant arts community.
WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Aug. 30

Human relations, robot relations, and Page to Stage.

NPR

Slaughter In The Subway: A Tale Of New York Terror

As a kid, author Victor LaValle loved horror stories. But it wasn't until he read Books of Blood by Clive Barker that he found one set in his own hometown. Have you ever read a book that took place where you live? Tell us in the comments.
NPR

A Linguist's Serious Take On 'The A-Word'

In his new book Ascent of the A-Word, linguist Geoffrey Nunberg looks at how the term took root among griping World War II GIs — and how its meaning evolved in the '60s and '70s. He tells Fresh Air that crude words are "wonderfully revealing."

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