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'The Scientists': A Father's Lie And A Family's Legacy

Marco Roth grew up on New York's Upper West Side in the 1980s, where a liberal Jewish culture infused with European tastes was breathing its last gasps. In his memoir, Roth describes how he learned — years after his father died from AIDS — that his father was probably gay.
NPR

Writing On The Lives Of Others

The Anisfield Book Awards recognize works that expand understanding of race and diversity. This year's Lifetime Achievement prize is going to Professor Arnold Rampersad for his biographies of prominent African-Americans like Langston Hughes, Jackie Robinson and W.E.B Du Bois. Host Michel Martin speaks to Professor Rampersad about his life's work.
NPR

Five Ways To Spot A Fake Online Review, Restaurant Or Otherwise

Online reviews of restaurants, travel deals, apps and just about anything you want to buy have become a powerful driver of consumer behavior. Unsurprisingly, they have also created a powerful incentive to cheat.
NPR

Tina Brown's Must Reads: The Modern Woman

The Daily Beast and Newsweek editor explores the changing role of women with recommendations that cover a groundbreaking gender discrimination lawsuit against Newsweek, a stay-at-home wife's rise through the professional ranks and the meaning behind a mother's profile picture.
WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, Sept. 12

Two tragedies and one of the funniest Russian plays ever written.

NPR

Toronto Film Fest Offers Hints Of Oscar Contenders

Audie Cornish talks to Bob Mondello about what's hot at this year's Toronto International Film Festival.
NPR

'Breed': A Pseudonym To Pen A Tale Of Horror

Author Scott Spencer is best known for his literary best-seller Endless Love — now, he's adopted a pseudonym, Chase Novak, to explore darker stories like the tale of baby lust and body horror in his new novel, Breed.
NPR

Stories From A New Generation Of American Soldiers

More than 10 years since a new generation of Americans went into combat, the soldiers themselves are starting to write the story of war. Three recent releases show how their experiences give them the authority to describe the war, fictionalize it, and even satirize it.

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