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Banksy Project Sends Fans Online To Find Art In The Streets

The British artist Banksy is holding a month-long show on the streets of New York. Every day, the reclusive street artist posts a photo of his latest piece and fans locate the piece through social media. But they have to find the art fast — it's often destroyed within hours of being discovered.
NPR

Bonham Carter Takes On Taylor, And She Did Her Homework

The actress spoke with NPR's Robert Siegel about playing the icon in BBC America's Burton and Taylor. The movie follows the preposterously famous '60s and '70s couple as they reunited for a 1983 Broadway production of Private Lives.
NPR

Why U.S. Taxpayers Pay $7 Billion A Year To Help Fast-Food Workers

Fifty-two percent of low-wage fast-food workers rely on public assistance programs like food stamps and Medicaid just to make ends meet, a fresh analysis finds. Many are adults supporting families. But some conservative economists say raising the minimum wage to $15 — as protesters are demanding — wouldn't help matters.
NPR

A Peek Into The Private Lives Of 'Burton And Taylor'

A new made-for-TV movie from BBC America dramatizes one particular period in the intertwined lives of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. Critic David Bianculli says less is more, and the film's narrow biographic focus is one of its strengths.
NPR

Meet 'The Brothers' Who Shaped U.S. Policy, Inside And Out

In 1953, President Dwight Eisenhower appointed John Foster Dulles as secretary of state, and Allen Dulles as director of the CIA. In his new book, The Brothers, journalist Stephen Kinzer says the Dulles' actions "helped set off some of the world's most profound long-term crises."
NPR

Behind The Lens With Prizewinning 'Women Of Vision'

Pulitzer Prize winner Lynsey Addario has spent more than 10 years as a war photographer. Kitra Cahana was just a teenager when her photography made the front page of The New York Times. They talk about their craft and being featured in National Geographic Museum's "Women of Vision" exhibition.
NPR

Banksy's Latest Work Takes On The Meat Industry ... With Puppets

The street artist's latest piece is called "Sirens of the Lambs," and it features a bunch of cuddly puppet animals peeking out of a slaughterhouse truck, squealing with fear. The truck is set to tour around New York City for the next week and a half.
WAMU 88.5

Private Donation Reopens Ford's Theatre

Ford's Theatre is reopening its doors and resuming performances with private funding, even though the government shutdown is continuing into a third week.
NPR

'Quiet Dell' Revives A Depression-Era Murder Story

In 1931, Harry Powers killed two women and three children at his home in Quiet Dell, W.Va. Writer Jayne Anne Phillips learned about the murders from her mother, who was a child when the deaths became a media sensation. Phillips' new novel retells the tragedy through the eyes of a young reporter.
NPR

Graham Nash Has 'Wild Tales' To Spare

As part of Crosby, Stills & Nash, the British singer-songwriter helped define a West Coast sound. Here, he discusses the influence of Buddy Holly, The Everly Brothers and marijuana on his career, as well as his new memoir, Wild Tales: A Rock & Roll Life.

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