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"Miss Manners Minds Your Business:" Etiquette In The Workplace

Whether you're a cubicle dweller or occupy a corner office, proper protocol in the office has changed drastically in recent years. Enter Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, who takes on everything from email etiquette to office dress codes in a new book.

WAMU 88.5

Professional Tips On Cell Phone Photography

Cell phone cameras are ubiquitous and their features are increasingly sophisticated. A professional photographer offers tips for taking great cell phone photos.

NPR

Is Public Numb To Mass Shootings?

Thirteen people died earlier this week during a shooting at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. But some people are saying the tragedy didn't get enough attention and Americans are becoming desensitized to mass shootings. Host Michel Martin asks the Barbershop guys what they think. Culture critic Jimi Izrael, law professor Paul Butler, writer Mario Loyola and youth mentor Farajii Muhammad weigh in.
NPR

Could Banning Books Actually Encourage More Readers?

What do the books "The Catcher in the Rye," "Invisible Man" and Anne Frank's diary have in common? They've all been banned from libraries. On Sunday, the American Library Association begins its annual recognition of Banned Books Week. Tell Me More host Michel Martin talks to former ALA president Loriene Roy about targeted books, and efforts to keep them on shelves.
WAMU 88.5

Dara Horn: "A Guide For The Perplexed"

A brilliant software developer, Josie, creates a program to record and archive everything we do and say. A 19th-century scholar discovers a treasure trove of ancient documents in a Cairo "genizah," or synagogue's repository for holy items that cannot be discarded. The narratives in Dara Horn's new novel intersect when Josie is kidnapped in Egypt, raising questions about what it means to remember the past.

NPR

Female Fans Love New Grand Theft Auto Despite Demeaning Content

Grand Theft Auto V took in more than $800 million in sales on its first day in stores. The edgy and violent adventure game series isn't just a hit with young men: A significant number of women play, though some of them are disappointed the new release doesn't feature prominent female characters.
NPR

Making Food From Flies (It's Not That Icky)

One of the really big challenges facing our world is how to grow more food without using up the globe's land and water. One company in Ohio says we've been ignoring one solution: insects. It's using larvae of the black soldier fly to convert waste into feed for fish or pigs.
NPR

Grand Theft Auto V, Out Tuesday, Already Made $800 Million

The video game "Grand Theft Auto V" made more than $800 million the first day it was released. Audie Cornish talks to Peter Rubin, a senior editor at Wired, about the video game that's on track to out-earn the summer's biggest movie blockbusters in only a few days.
NPR

Man Who Made Nintendo Into A Video Game Empire Dies

Hiroshi Yamauchi, who led Nintendo from a trading card company to the video game giant it is today, died Thursday at the age of 85. Some of Nintendo's most iconic characters — including Mario Brothers, Donkey Kong and Zelda — were created under Yamauchi's leadership.
NPR

Yasmin Thayná: 'I Always Wanted To Make Literature With My Hair'

A young writer from the outskirts of Rio reads an excerpt from a story in which she lets her chemically straightened hair go natural. The story, "Mc K-Bela," was published in a literary magazine that features the work of writers from favelas and what Thayná calls "the people's neighborhoods."

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