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Krauthammer's Tactical Advice For The Republican Party

Charles Krauthammer once was a psychiatrist and a self-described "Great Society liberal." Now he's a Pulitzer Prize-winning, nationally syndicated conservative columnist. His new book, Things That Matter, presents a selection of his writings from three decades spent observing politics and culture.
NPR

Getting 'Banksied' Comes With A Price — And Maybe A Paycheck

Last week, Cara Tabachnick got a text from her father: "Our building got Banksied and there's a crowd gathering outside. What do we do?" British graffiti artist Banksy chose their wall as a canvas. Now, the Tabachnicks are fending off vandals and facing big decisions.
NPR

Are You A Sage Foodie? A Quiz To Test Your Food Literacy

The folks behind Food Day have devised a quiz to gauge your knowledge of all things food — from farm to table. Even if you think you know a lot about food and sustainability, there are a few tricks here that might trip you up.
NPR

Anthony Weiner (The Myth, Not The Man) Takes The Stage

The former congressman's exploits have been turned into an off-off-Broadway play, The Weiner Monologues. The production uses only found text — articles, talk-show jokes, Weiner's own words, and so on — in its script.
NPR

Put Some Sizzle In Your Halloween Costume ... With Sausage?

Costumes made of real food have long provoked reactions of both delight and horror. Many have sparked discussions about race, hunger, vegetarianism, commercialism, sexuality, morality and the ever-popular female body image. Here are a few of the more memorable examples.
WAMU 88.5

'War Of The Worlds,' 75 Years Later

It was 75 years ago that Orson Welles produced one of the most famous broadcasts in radio history: "War of the Worlds." But much of the mythology now associated with the original broadcast -- stories of miscarriages and suicides -- may be as fictional as the play's alien invasion storyline. Radio historian Neil Verma joins Kojo to explore what really happened, as well as the craft behind the radio play itself

NPR

For John Kander, A New 'Landing' At A Familiar Spot

The 86-year-old Broadway titan — who co-wrote such hits as Cabaret and Chicago with the late Fred Ebb — is back with a new show and a new writing partner, 35-year-old Greg Pierce.
NPR

'Identical' Stumbles Outside The Courtroom

In Identical, Scott Turow opens a cold case involving a set of twins and a murder long thought solved. Whatever the premise may lead you to believe, though, this novel is neither funny nor especially thrilling. Reviewer Rosecrans Baldwin explains that the book is at its best in the courtroom, but elsewhere, it plods.
NPR

Coffee Coming Up, Nice And Hot ... And Prepared By A Robot

The 50-square-foot Coffee Haus from Briggo offers made-to-order espressos, cappuccinos and other specialty brews from direct-trade beans. Like any good neighborhood barista, it will even remember your favorite order.
NPR

Antibiotics Can't Keep Up With 'Nightmare' Superbugs

On Tuesday night PBS' Frontline will investigate how decades of antibiotic overuse has led to the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. Journalist David Hoffman says that understanding and fighting these bacteria should be a national priority. "A simple scrape on the playground could be fatal," he says.

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