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Listening Back To An Interview With Phil Ramone

Ramone started out as a sound engineer for Lesley Gore, and went on to work with Simon and Garfunkel, Barbra Streisand and Frank Sinatra. He died Saturday at the age of 79. Fresh Air remembers him by listening back to a 1995 interview. He talks about losing old demos and being mistaken for a member of The Ramones.
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Cable And Corruption In Southern California

The Galloway brothers, Clinton and Carl, spent most of the 1980s fighting to get poor minorities in Southern California access to cable television. It was a struggle that took them from City Hall to the Supreme Court. Clinton Galloway talks with host Celeste Headlee about his new memoir, Anatomy of a Hustle: Cable Comes to South Central L.A.
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Newark Doctor Aims To Be Education's 'Michael Jordan'

Dr. Sampson Davis had a tough upbringing in New Jersey. But then he turned his life around, went to medical school, and became an E.R. doctor. He now treats patients in the same town where he grew up. Dr. Davis talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about his new memoir, Living and Dying in Brick City: An E.R. Doctor Returns Home.
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Viewer Discretion: Deciding When To Look Away

Decisions like whether to watch a grisly injury on replay underscore the fact that with less gatekeeping and more personal choice, we're all stuck with wrangling our own curiosity.
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Book News: Shakespeare Was A Tax Evader And Food Hoarder, Researchers Say

Also: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie disses V. S. Naipaul; a new biography of Derrida; and the best books coming out this week.
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'A Lovely Feeling': Celebrating Older Women With Fabulous Style

The fashion industry is sometimes criticized for unrealistic portrayals of young women. But if you're a woman older than 60, there are almost no portrayals, realistic or otherwise. Now a fashion blog called Advanced Style has made stars of some of these older fashionistas, including a 93-year-old who says the spotlight makes her feel like she's "part of the world."
NPR

An Unlikely Explorer Stumbles Into Controversy

The mostly forgotten explorer Paul du Chaillu first introduced the world to gorillas. His methods were attacked and his work discredited during his lifetime, but he also experienced fame and redemption. Now, there's a new book that tells his story.

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