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National Museum of African American History Opens Its Doors

More than 100 years after it was originally proposed, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is opening its doors in Washington, D.C.
NPR

Not My Job: Jamie Lee Curtis Gets Quizzed On Unlikely Inventions

In the late 1980s, Curtis filed a patent for a diaper/baby wipe combo, so we've invited her to play a game called "Eureka!" Three questions about inventors and their inventions.
NPR

'Let There Be Laughter': Modern Jewish Jokes Poke At Assimilation

Michael Krasny's new book is called Let There Be Laughter. He tells NPR's Scott Simon about this treasury of great Jewish jokes, and why they matter.
NPR

While Everyone Was Partying At Woodstock, I Was Stuck At Schrafft's

The chain restaurant that catered to women helped redefine how Americans eat, according to a new book. For NPR's Lynn Neary, it also defined how she did and didn't fit with the counterculture.
NPR

Ugandan Actress's Journey Mirrors That Of Her 'Queen Of Katwe' Character

Like her chess champion character, first-time film actress Madina Nalwanga grew up in a poor neighborhood in Uganda. She says co-star Lupita Nyong'o has been her guide to the world of moviemaking.
NPR

This Freshly Diverse 'Seven' Ups The Firepower

The Magnificent Seven is a remake of a movie that's already a remake that's updated in both casting and body count.
NPR

'Audrie & Daisy' Explores Social Media Shaming After Sexual Assaults

NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to co-directors and husband and wife duo, Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk, about their documentary, Audrie & Daisy. The documentary addresses the sexual assault — and ensuing social media shaming — of two high school girls.
NPR

Mary Karr On Writing Memoirs: 'No Doubt I've Gotten A Million Things Wrong'

Karr discusses the faults of memory, the challenges of writing about loved ones and the pain of deleting pages because "there was something untrue about them." Originally broadcast Sept. 15, 2015.
NPR

It's Hard to Tell Who's Shooting Whom In 'The Magnificent Seven'

Critic David Edelstein says that despite its irresistible plot, Antoine Fuqua's remake of the 1960 classic Western is ultimately "just another formula revenge picture."
NPR

'Darktown' Imagines What It Was Like For Atlanta's First Black Policemen

In 1948, eight African-American men joined Atlanta's police force. Those pioneer officers — who couldn't drive squad cars or even step foot in headquarters — inspired Thomas Mullen's new novel.

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